Workshop on Replication in the Sciences: Society for Philosophy and Psychology: (2nd part of double header)

brain-quadrants2nd part of the double header:

Society for Philosophy and Psychology (SPP): 41st Annual meeting

SPP 2015 Program

Wednesday, June 3rd
1:30-6:30: Preconference Workshop on Replication in the Sciences, organized by Edouard Machery

1:30-2:15: Edouard Machery (Pitt)
2:15-3:15: Andrew Gelman (Columbia, Statistics, via video link)
3:15-4:15: Deborah Mayo (Virginia Tech, Philosophy)
4:15-4:30: Break
4:30-5:30: Uri Simonshon (Penn, Psychology)
5:30-6:30: Tal Yarkoni (University of Texas, Neuroscience)

 SPP meeting: 4-6 June 2015 at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina


First part of the double header:

The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference, 2015 APS Annual Convention Saturday, May 23  2:00 PM- 3:50 PM in Wilder (Marriott Marquis 1535 B’way)aps_2015_logo_cropped-1

Andrew Gelman
Stephen Senn
Deborah Mayo
Richard Morey, Session Chair & Discussant

taxi: VA-NYC-NC

 See earlier post for Frank Sinatra and more details
Categories: Announcement, reproducibility | Leave a comment

Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

Start Spreading the News…..



 The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference,
2015 APS Annual Convention
Saturday, May 23  
2:00 PM- 3:50 PM in Wilder

(Marriott Marquis 1535 B’way)





Andrew Gelman

Professor of Statistics & Political Science
Columbia University



Stephen Senn

Head of Competence Center
for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)

Luxembourg Institute of Health



D. Mayo headshot

D.G. Mayo, Philosopher



Richard Morey, Session Chair & Discussant

Senior Lecturer
School of Psychology
Cardiff University
Categories: Announcement, Bayesian/frequentist, Statistics | 8 Comments

Announcing Kent Staley’s new book, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (CUP)


Kent Staley has written a clear and engaging introduction to PhilSci that manages to blend the central key topics of philosophy of science with current philosophy of statistics. Quite possibly, Staley explains Error Statistics more clearly in many ways than I do in his 10 page section, 9.4. CONGRATULATIONS STALEY*

You can get this book for free by merely writing one of the simpler palindrome’s in the December contest.

Here’s an excerpt from that section:



9.4 Error-statistical philosophy of science and severe testing

Deborah Mayo has developed an alternative approach to the interpretation of frequentist statistical inference (Mayo 1996). But the idea at the heart of Mayo’s approach is one that can be stated without invoking probability at all. ….

Mayo takes the following “minimal scientific principle for evidence” to be uncontroversial:

Principle 3 (Minimal principle for evidence) Data xo provide poor evidence for H if they result from a method or procedure that has little or no ability of finding flaws in H, even if H is false.(Mayo and Spanos, 2009, 3) Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome, Statistics, StatSci meets PhilSci | Tags: | 10 Comments

My Rutgers Seminar: tomorrow, December 3, on philosophy of statistics

picture-216-1I’ll be talking about philosophy of statistics tomorrow afternoon at Rutgers University, in the Statistics and Biostatistics Department, if you happen to be in the vicinity and are interested.


Seminar Speaker:     Professor Deborah Mayo, Virginia Tech

Title:           Probing with Severity: Beyond Bayesian Probabilism and Frequentist Performance

Time:          3:20 – 4:20pm, Wednesday, December 3, 2014 Place:         552 Hill Center


Probing with Severity: Beyond Bayesian Probabilism and Frequentist Performance Getting beyond today’s most pressing controversies revolving around statistical methods, I argue, requires scrutinizing their underlying statistical philosophies.Two main philosophies about the roles of probability in statistical inference are probabilism and performance (in the long-run). The first assumes that we need a method of assigning probabilities to hypotheses; the second assumes that the main function of statistical method is to control long-run performance. I offer a third goal: controlling and evaluating the probativeness of methods. An inductive inference, in this conception, takes the form of inferring hypotheses to the extent that they have been well or severely tested. A report of poorly tested claims must also be part of an adequate inference. I develop a statistical philosophy in which error probabilities of methods may be used to evaluate and control the stringency or severity of tests. I then show how the “severe testing” philosophy clarifies and avoids familiar criticisms and abuses of significance tests and cognate methods (e.g., confidence intervals). Severity may be threatened in three main ways: fallacies of statistical tests, unwarranted links between statistical and substantive claims, and violations of model assumptions.

Categories: Announcement, Statistics | 4 Comments

September 2014: Blog Contents

metablog old fashion typewriterSeptember 2014: Error Statistics Philosophy
Blog Table of Contents 

Compiled by Jean A. Miller

  • (9/30) Letter from George (Barnard)
  • (9/27) Should a “Fictionfactory” peepshow be barred from a festival on “Truth and Reality”? Diederik Stapel says no (rejected post)
  • (9/23) G.A. Barnard: The Bayesian “catch-all” factor: probability vs likelihood
  • (9/21) Statistical Theater of the Absurd: “Stat on a Hot Tin Roof”
  • (9/18) Uncle Sam wants YOU to help with scientific reproducibility!
  • (9/15) A crucial missing piece in the Pistorius trial? (2): my answer (Rejected Post)
  • (9/12) “The Supernal Powers Withhold Their Hands And Let Me Alone”: C.S. Peirce
  • (9/6) Statistical Science: The Likelihood Principle issue is out…!
  • (9/4) All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy Contents-3 years on
  • (9/3) 3 in blog years: Sept 3 is 3rd anniversary of





Categories: Announcement, blog contents, Statistics | Leave a comment

Uncle Sam wants YOU to help with scientific reproducibility!

You still have a few days to respond to the call of your country to solve problems of scientific reproducibility!

The following passages come from Retraction Watch, with my own recommendations at the end.

“White House takes notice of reproducibility in science, and wants your opinion”

ostpThe White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is taking a look at innovation and scientific research, and issues of reproducibility have made it onto its radar.

Here’s the description of the project from the Federal Register:

The Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Economic Council request public comments to provide input into an upcoming update of the Strategy for American Innovation, which helps to guide the Administration’s efforts to promote lasting economic growth and competitiveness through policies that support transformative American innovation in products, processes, and services and spur new fundamental discoveries that in the long run lead to growing economic prosperity and rising living standards.

I wonder what Steven Pinker would say about some of the above verbiage?

And here’s what’s catching the eye of people interested in scientific reproducibility:

(11) Given recent evidence of the irreproducibility of a surprising number of published scientific findings, how can the Federal Government leverage its role as a significant funder of scientific research to most effectively address the problem?

The OSTP is the same office that, in 2013, took what Nature called “a long-awaited leap forward for open access” when it said “that publications from taxpayer-funded research should be made free to read after a year’s delay.That OSTP memo came after more than 65,000 people “signed a We the People petition asking for expanded public access to the results of taxpayer-funded research.”

Have ideas on improving reproducibility? Emails to are preferred, according to the notice, which also explains how to fax or mail comments. The deadline is September 23.

Off the top of my head, how about:

Promote the use of methodologies that:

  • control and assess the capabilities of methods to avoid mistaken inferences from data;
  • require demonstrated self-criticism all the way from the data collection, modelling and interpretation (statistical and substantive);
  • describe what is especially shaky or poorly probed thus far (and spell out how subsequent studies are most likely to locate those flaws)[i]

Institute penalties for QRPs and fraud?

Please offer your suggestions in the comments, or directly to Uncle Sam.

 [i]It may require a certain courage on the part of researchers, journalists, referees.

Categories: Announcement, reproducibility | 18 Comments

3 in blog years: Sept 3 is 3rd anniversary of

Where did you hear this?  “Join me, if you will, for a little deep-water drilling, as I cast about on my isle of Elba.” Remember this and this? And this philosophical treatise on “moving blog day”? Oy, did I really write all this stuff?

cake baked by blog staff for 3 year anniversary of

I still see this as my rag-tag amateur blog. I never learned html and don’t have time to now. But the blog enterprise was more jocund and easy-going then–just an experiment, really, and a place to discuss our RMM papers. (And, of course, a home for error statistical philosophers-in-exile).

A blog table of contents for all three years will appear tomorrow.

Anyway, 2 representatives from Elba flew into NYC and  baked this cake in my never-used Chef’s oven (based on the cover/table of contents of EGEK 1996). We’ll be celebrating at A Different Place tonight[i]–so if you’re in the neighborhood, stop by after 8pm for an Elba Grease (on me).

Do you want a free signed copy of EGEK? Say why in 25 words or less (to, and the Fund for E.R.R.O.R.* will send them to the top 3 submissions (by 9/10/14).**

Acknowledgments: I want to thank the many commentators for their frequent insights and for keeping things interesting and lively. Among the regulars, and semi-regulars (but with impact) off the top of my head, and in no order: Senn, Yanofsky, Byrd, Gelman, Schachtman, Kepler, McKinney, S. Young, Matloff, O’Rourke, Gandenberger, Wasserman, E. Berk, Spanos, Glymour, Rohde, Greenland, Omaclaren,someone named Mark, assorted guests, original guests, and anons, and mysterious visitors, related twitterers (who would rather tweet from afar). I’m sure I’ve left some people out. Thanks to students and participants in the spring 2014 seminar with Aris Spanos (slides and lecture notes are still up).

I’m especially grateful to my regular guest bloggers: Stephen Senn and Aris Spanos, and to those who were subjected to deconstructions and to U-Phils in years past. (I may return to that some time.) Other guest posters for 2014 will be acknowledged in the year round up.

I thank blog compilers, Jean Miler and Nicole Jinn, and give special thanks for the tireless efforts of Jean Miller who has slogged through html, or whatever it is, when necessary, has scanned and put up dozens of articles to make them easy for readers to access, taken slow ferries back and forth to the island of Elba, and fixed gazillions of glitches on a daily basis. Last, but not least, to the palindromists who have been winning lots of books recently (1 day left for August submissions).

*Experimental Reasoning, Reliability, Objectivity and Rationality.

** Accompany submissions with an e-mail address and regular address. All submissions remain private. Elba judges decisions are final. Void in any places where prohibited by laws, be they laws of likelihood or Napoleanic laws-in-exile. But seriously, we’re giving away 3 books.

[i]email for directions.

Categories: Announcement, Statistics | 12 Comments

Blogging Boston JSM2014?



I’m not there. (Several people have asked, I guess because I blogged JSM13.) If you hear of talks (or anecdotes) of interest to error, please comment here (or twitter: @learnfromerror)

Categories: Announcement | 7 Comments

Winner of June Palindrome Contest: Lori Wike



Winner of June 2014 Palindrome Contest: First Second* Time Winner! Lori Wike

*Her April win is here


Parsec? I overfit omen as Elba sung “I err on! Oh, honor reign!” Usable, sane motif revoices rap.

The requirement: A palindrome with Elba plus overfit. (The optional second word: “average” was not needed to win.)


Lori Wike is principal bassoonist of the Utah Symphony and is on the faculty of the University of Utah and Westminster College. She holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the Eastman School of Music and a Master of Arts degree in Comparative Literature from UC-Irvine.

Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome | Leave a comment

Scientism and Statisticism: a conference* (i)

images-11A lot of philosophers and scientists seem to be talking about scientism these days–either championing it or worrying about it. What is it? It’s usually a pejorative term describing an unwarranted deference to the so-called scientific method over and above other methods of inquiry. Some push it as a way to combat postmodernism (is that even still around?) Stephen Pinker gives scientism a positive spin (and even offers it as a cure for the malaise of the humanities!)[1]. Anyway, I’m to talk at a conference on Scientism (*not statisticism, that’s my word) taking place in NYC May 16-17. It is organized by Massimo Pigliucci (chair of philosophy at CUNY-Lehman), who has written quite a lot on the topic in the past few years. Information can be found here. In thinking about scientism for this conference, however, I was immediately struck by this puzzle: Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, PhilStatLaw, science communication, Statistical fraudbusting, StatSci meets PhilSci | Tags: | 15 Comments

Winner of April Palindrome contest: Lori Wike


Lori Wike

Winner of April 2014 Palindrome Contest:

Lori Wike


Pose ad: ‘Elba fallacy amid aged? Amygdala error or real?’ Ad: gym ad? Egad! I may call a fabled Aesop.

The requirement: A palindrome with Elba plus “fallacy” with an optional second word: “error”. A palindrome using both topped an acceptable palindrome using only “fallacy”. All April submissions used both. Other April finalists are here.


Lori Wike is principal bassoonist of the Utah Symphony and is on the faculty of the University of Utah and Westminster College. She holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the Eastman School of Music and a Master of Arts degree in Comparative Literature from UC-Irvine.

Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome | 1 Comment

Putting the brakes on the breakthrough: An informal look at the argument for the Likelihood Principle



Friday, May 2, 2014, I will attempt to present my critical analysis of the Birnbaum argument for the (strong) Likelihood Principle, so as to be accessible to a general philosophy audience (flyer below). Can it be done? I don’t know yet, this is a first. It will consist of:

  • Example 1: Trying and Trying Again: Optional stopping
  • Example 2: Two instruments with different precisions
    [you shouldn’t get credit (or blame) for something you didn’t do]
  • The Breakthough: Birnbaumization
  • Imaginary dialogue with Allan Birnbaum

The full paper is here. My discussion takes several pieces a reader can explore further by searching this blog (e.g., under SLP, brakes e.g., here, Birnbaum, optional stopping). I will post slides afterwards.

Mayo poster

Categories: Announcement, Birnbaum Brakes, Statistics, strong likelihood principle | 23 Comments

Phil 6334 Visitor: S. Stanley Young, “Statistics and Scientific Integrity”

We are pleased to announce our guest speaker at Thursday’s seminar (April 24, 2014): Statistics and Scientific Integrity”:

YoungPhoto2008S. Stanley Young, PhD 
Assistant Director for Bioinformatics
National Institute of Statistical Sciences
Research Triangle Park, NC

Author of Resampling-Based Multiple Testing, Westfall and Young (1993) Wiley.





The main readings for the discussion are:


Categories: Announcement, evidence-based policy, Phil6334, science communication, selection effects, Statistical fraudbusting, Statistics | 4 Comments

Self-referential blogpost (conditionally accepted*)

This is a blogpost on a talk (by Jeremy Fox) on blogging that will be live tweeted here at Virginia Tech on Monday April 7, and the moment I post this blog on “Blogging as a Mode of Scientific Communication” it will be tweeted. Live.

Jeremy’s upcoming talk on blogging will be live-tweeted by @FisheriesBlog, 1 pm EDT Apr. 7

Posted on April 3, 2014 by Jeremy Fox

If you like to follow live tweets of talks, you’re in luck: my upcoming Virginia Tech talk on blogging will be live tweeted by Brandon Peoples, a grad student there who co-authors The Fisheries Blog. Follow @FisheriesBlog at 1 pm US Eastern Daylight Time on Monday, April 7 for the live tweets.

Jeremy Fox’s excellent blog, “Dynamic Ecology,” often discusses matters statistical from a perspective in sync with error statistics.

I’ve never been invited to talk about blogging or even to blog about blogging, maybe this is a new trend. I look forward to meeting him (live!).


* Posts that don’t directly pertain to philosophy of science/statistics are placed under “rejected posts” but since this is a metablogpost on a talk on a blog pertaining to statistics it has been “conditionally accepted”, unconditionally, i.e., without conditions.

Categories: Announcement, Metablog | Leave a comment

Winner of the March 2014 palindrome contest (rejected post)

caitlin-parkerWinner of the March 2014 Palindrome Contest

Caitlin Parker


Able, we’d well aim on. I bet on a note. Binomial? Lewd. Ew, Elba!

The requirement was: A palindrome with Elba plus Binomial with an optional second word: bet. A palindrome that uses both Binomial and bet topped an acceptable palindrome that only uses Binomial.

Short bio: 
Caitlin Parker is a first-year master’s student in the Philosophy department at Virginia Tech. Though her interests are in philosophy of science and statistics, she also has experience doing psychological research. Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome, Rejected Posts | Leave a comment

Cosma Shalizi gets tenure (at last!) (metastat announcement)

ShaliziNews Flash! Congratulations to Cosma Shalizi who announced yesterday that he’d been granted tenure (Statistics, Carnegie Mellon). Cosma is a leading error statistician, a creative polymath and long-time blogger (at Three-Toad sloth). Shalizi wrote an early book review of EGEK (Mayo 1996)* that people still send me from time to time, in case I hadn’t seen it! You can find it on this blog from 2 years ago (posted by Jean Miller). A discussion of a meeting of the minds between Shalizi and Andrew Gelman is here.

*Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge.

Categories: Announcement, Error Statistics, Statistics | Tags: | Leave a comment

Winner of the Febrary 2014 palindrome contest (rejected post)

SamHeadWinner of February 2014 Palindrome Contest
Samuel Dickson

Rot, Cadet A, I’ve droned! Elba, revile deviant, naïve, deliverable den or deviated actor.

The requirement was: A palindrome with Elba plus deviate with an optional second word: deviant. A palindrome that uses both deviate and deviant tops an acceptable palindrome that only uses deviate.

Sam Dickson is a regulatory statistician at U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) with experience in statistical consulting, specializing in design and analysis of biological and genetics/genomics studies.

“It’s great to get a  chance to exercise the mind with something other than statistics, though putting words together to make a palindrome is a puzzle very similar to designing an experiment that answers the right question.  Thank you for hosting this contest!”

Choice of book:
Principles of Applied Statistics (D. R. Cox and C. A. Donnelly 2011, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

Congratulations, Sam! I hope that your opting to do two words (plus Elba) means we can go back to the tougher standard for palindromes, but I’d just as soon raise the level of competence for several months more (sticking to one word). 

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome, Rejected Posts, Statistics | Leave a comment

Phil6334 Statistical Snow Sculpture

Statistical Snow Sculpture

Statistical Snow Sculpture

No Seminar. Blizzard.

Categories: Announcement, Phil6334 | Leave a comment

BOSTON COLLOQUIUM FOR PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE: Revisiting the Foundations of Statistics


54th Annual Program

Download the 54th Annual Program


Cosponsored by the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at Boston University.
Friday, February 21, 2014
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Photonics Center, 9th Floor Colloquium Room (Rm 906)
8 St. Mary’s Street

10 a.m.–noon

  • Computational Challenges in Genomic Medicine
    Jill Mesirov Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Broad Institute
  • Selection, Significance, and Signification: Issues in High Energy Physics
    Kent Staley Philosophy, Saint Louis University

1:30–5:30 p.m.

  • Multi-Resolution Inference: An Engineering (Engineered?) Foundation of Statistical Inference
    Xiao-Li Meng Statistics, Harvard University
  • Is the Philosophy of Probabilism an Obstacle to Statistical Fraud Busting?
    Deborah Mayo Philosophy, Virginia Tech
  • Targeted Learning from Big Data
    Mark van der Laan Biostatistics and Statistics, UC Berkeley

Panel Discussion

Boston Colloquium 2013-2014 (3)

Categories: Announcement, philosophy of science, Philosophy of Statistics, Statistical fraudbusting, Statistics | Leave a comment

Winner of the January 2014 palindrome contest (rejected post)

images-5Winner of the January 2014 Palindrome Context

Karthik Durvasula
Visiting Assistant Professor in Phonology & Phonetics at Michigan State University

Palindrome: Test’s optimal? Agreed! Able to honor? O no! Hot Elba deer gala. MIT-post set.

The requirement was: A palindrome with “optimal” and “Elba”.

BioI’m a Visiting Assistant Professor in Phonology & Phonetics at Michigan State University. My work primarily deals with probing people’s subconscious knowledge of (abstract) sound patterns. Recently, I have been working on auditory illusions that stem from the bias that such subconscious knowledge introduces.

Statement: “Trying to get a palindrome that was at least partially meaningful was fun and challenging. Plus I get an awesome book for my efforts. What more could a guy ask for! I also want to thank Mayo for being excellent about email correspondence, and answering my (sometimes silly) questions tirelessly.”

Book choice: EGEK 1996! :)
[i.e.,Mayo (1996): “Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge”]

CONGRATULATIONS! And thanks so much for your interest!

February contest: Elba plus deviate (deviation)*

New Rule: Using both deviate and deviant tops an acceptable palindrome that only uses deviate (but can earn 1/2 prize voucher for doubling on another month).

Categories: Announcement, Palindrome, Rejected Posts | Leave a comment

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