Statistics

Telling What’s True About Power, if practicing within the error-statistical tribe

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Suppose you are reading about a statistically significant result x from a one-sided test T+ of the mean of a Normal distribution with n iid samples, and (for simplicity) known σ:   H0: µ ≤  0 against H1: µ >  0.

I have heard some people say:

A. If the test’s power to detect alternative µ’ is very low, then the statistically significant x is poor evidence of a discrepancy (from the null) corresponding to µ’.  (i.e., there’s poor evidence that  µ > µ’ ).*See point on language in notes.

They will generally also hold that if POW(µ’) is reasonably high (at least .5), then the inference to µ > µ’ is warranted, or at least not problematic.

I have heard other people say:

B. If the test’s power to detect alternative µ’ is very low, then the statistically significant x is good evidence of a discrepancy (from the null) corresponding to µ’ (i.e., there’s good evidence that  µ > µ’).

They will generally also hold that if POW(µ’) is reasonably high (at least .5), then the inference to µ > µ’ is unwarranted.

Which is correct, from the perspective of the (error statistical) philosophy, within which power and associated tests are defined?

Allow the test assumptions are adequately met. I have often said on this blog, and I repeat, the most misunderstood and abused (or unused) concept from frequentist statistics is that of a test’s power to reject the null hypothesis under the assumption alternative µ’ is true: POW(µ’). I deliberately write it in this correct manner because it is faulty to speak of the power of a test without specifying against what alternative it’s to be computed. It will also get you into trouble if you define power as in the first premise in a recent post:

the probability of correctly rejecting the null

–which is both ambiguous and fails to specify the all important conjectured alternative. [For handholding slides on power, please see this post.] That you compute power for several alternatives is not the slightest bit problematic; it’s precisely what you want to do in order to assess the test’s capability to detect discrepancies. If you knew the true parameter value, why would you be running an inquiry to make statistical inferences about it?

It must be kept in mind that inferences are going to be in the form of µ > µ’ =µ+ δ,  or µ < µ’ =µ+ δ  or the like. They are not to point values! (Not even to the point µ =M0.) Most simply, you may consider that the inference is in terms of the one-sided lower confidence bound (for various confidence levels)–the dual for test T+.

DEFINITION: POW(T+,µ’) = POW(Test T+ rejects H0;µ’) = Pr(M > M*; µ’), where M is the sample mean and M* is the cut-off for rejection. (Since it’s continuous it doesn’t matter if we write > or ≥). I’ll leave off the T+ and write POW(µ’).

In terms of P-values: POW(µ’) = Pr(P < p*; µ’) where P < p* corresponds to rejecting the null hypothesis at the given level.

Let σ = 10, n = 100, so (σ/ √n) = 1.  (Nice and simple!) Test T+ rejects Hat the .025 level if  M  > 1.96(1). For simplicity, let the cut-off, M*, be 2.

Test T+ rejects Hat ~ .025 level if M >  2.  

CASE 1:  We need a µ’ such that POW(µ’) = low. The power against alternatives between the null and the cut-off M* will range from α to .5. Consider the power against the null:

1. POW(µ = 0) = α = .025.

Since the the probability of M > 2, under the assumption that µ = 0, is low, the significant result indicates  µ > 0.  That is, since power against µ = 0 is low, the statistically significant result is a good indication that µ > 0.

Equivalently, 0 is the lower bound of a .975 confidence interval.

2. For a second example of low power that does not use the null: We get power of .04 if µ’ = M* – 1.75 (σ/ √n) unit –which in this case is (2 – 1.75) .25. That is, POW(.25) =.04.[ii]

Equivalently, µ >.25 is the lower confidence interval (CI) at level .96 (this is the CI that is dual to the test T+.)

CASE 2:  We need a µ’ such that POW(µ’) = high. Using one of our power facts, POW(M* + 1(σ/ √n)) = .84.

3. That is, adding one (σ/ √n) unit to the cut-off M* takes us to an alternative against which the test has power = .84. So µ = 2 + 1 will work: POW(T+, µ = 3) = .84. See this post.

Should we say that the significant result is a good indication that µ > 3?  No, the confidence level would be .16. 

Pr(M > 2;  µ = 3 ) = Pr(Z > -1) = .84. It would be terrible evidence for µ > 3!

IMG_1781

Blue curve is the null, red curve is one possible conjectured alternative: µ = 3. Green area is power, little turquoise area is α.

As Stephen Senn points out (in my favorite of his posts), the alternative against which we set high power is the discrepancy from the null that “we should not like to miss”, delta Δ.  Δ is not the discrepancy we may infer from a significant result (in a test where POW(Δ, ) = .84).

So the correct answer is B.

Does A hold true if we happen to know (based on previous severe tests) that µ <µ’? I’ll return to this.

*Point on language: “to detect alternative µ'” means, “produce a statistically significant result when µ = µ’.” It does not mean we infer µ’. Nor do we know the underlying µ’ after we see the data. Perhaps the strict definition should be employed unless one is clear on this. The power of the test to detect µ’ just refers to the probability the test would produce a result that rings the significance alarm, if the data were generated from a world or experiment where µ = µ’.

[i] I surmise, without claiming a scientific data base, that this fallacy has been increasing over the past few years. It was discussed way back when in Morrison and Henkel (1970). (A relevant post relates to a Jackie Mason comedy routine.) Research was even conducted to figure out how psychologists could be so wrong. Wherever I’ve seen it, it’s due to (explicitly or implicitly) transposing the conditional in a Bayesian use of power. For example, (1 – β)/ α is treated as a kind of likelihood in a Bayesian computation. I say this is unwarranted, even for a Bayesian’s goal, see 2/10/15 post below.

[ii]  Pr(M > 2;  µ = .25 ) = Pr(Z > 1.75) = .04.

OTHER RELEVANT POSTS ON POWER

Categories: confidence intervals and tests, power, Statistics | 11 Comments

Stephen Senn: Randomization, ratios and rationality: rescuing the randomized clinical trial from its critics

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Stephen Senn
Head of Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health

This post first appeared here. An issue sometimes raised about randomized clinical trials is the problem of indefinitely many confounders. This, for example is what John Worrall has to say:

Even if there is only a small probability that an individual factor is unbalanced, given that there are indefinitely many possible confounding factors, then it would seem to follow that the probability that there is some factor on which the two groups are unbalanced (when remember randomly constructed) might for all anyone knows be high. (Worrall J. What evidence is evidence-based medicine? Philosophy of Science 2002; 69: S316-S330: see p. S324 )

It seems to me, however, that this overlooks four matters. The first is that it is not indefinitely many variables we are interested in but only one, albeit one we can’t measure perfectly. This variable can be called ‘outcome’. We wish to see to what extent the difference observed in outcome between groups is compatible with the idea that chance alone explains it. The indefinitely many covariates can help us predict outcome but they are only of interest to the extent that they do so. However, although we can’t measure the difference we would have seen in outcome between groups in the absence of treatment, we can measure how much it varies within groups (where the variation cannot be due to differences between treatments). Thus we can say a great deal about random variation to the extent that group membership is indeed random.

The second point is that in the absence of a treatment effect, where randomization has taken place, the statistical theory predicts probabilistically how the variation in outcome between groups relates to the variation within.The third point, strongly related to the other two, is that statistical inference in clinical trials proceeds using ratios. The F statistic produced from Fisher’s famous analysis of variance is the ratio of the variance between to the variance within and calculated using observed outcomes. (The ratio form is due to Snedecor but Fisher’s approach using semi-differences of natural logarithms is equivalent.) The critics of randomization are talking about the effect of the unmeasured covariates on the numerator of this ratio. However, any factor that could be imbalanced between groups could vary strongly within and thus while the numerator would be affected, so would the denominator. Any Bayesian will soon come to the conclusion that, given randomization, coherence imposes strong constraints on the degree to which one expects an unknown something to inflate the numerator (which implies not only differing between groups but also, coincidentally, having predictive strength) but not the denominator.

The final point is that statistical inferences are probabilistic: either about statistics in the frequentist mode or about parameters in the Bayesian mode. Many strong predictors varying from patient to patient will tend to inflate the variance within groups; this will be reflected in due turn in wider confidence intervals for the estimated treatment effect. It is not enough to attack the estimate. Being a statistician means never having to say you are certain. It is not the estimate that has to be attacked to prove a statistician a liar, it is the certainty with which the estimate has been expressed. We don’t call a man a liar who claims that with probability one half you will get one head in two tosses of a coin just because you might get two tails.

Categories: RCTs, S. Senn, Statistics | Tags: , | 6 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (JULY 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...
3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: July 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.[1]  This new feature, appearing the last week of each month, began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014. (Once again it was tough to pick just 3; please check out others which might interest you, e.g., Schachtman on StatLaw, the machine learning conference on simplicity, the story of Lindley and particle physics, Glymour and so on.)

July 2012

[1] excluding those recently reblogged. Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils” count as one.

Categories: 3-year memory lane, Statistics | Leave a comment

“Statistical Significance” According to the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services (ii)

Mayo elbow

Mayo, frustrated

Someone linked this to me on Twitter. I thought it was a home blog at first. Surely the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services can give a better definition than this.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Effective Health Care Program
Glossary of Terms

We know that many of the concepts used on this site can be difficult to understand. For that reason, we have provided you with a glossary to help you make sense of the terms used in Comparative Effectiveness Research. Every word that is defined in this glossary should appear highlighted throughout the Web site…..

Statistical Significance

Definition: A mathematical technique to measure whether the results of a study are likely to be true. Statistical significance is calculated as the probability that an effect observed in a research study is occurring because of chance. Statistical significance is usually expressed as a P-value. The smaller the P-value, the less likely it is that the results are due to chance (and more likely that the results are true). Researchers generally believe the results are probably true if the statistical significance is a P-value less than 0.05 (p<.05).

Example: For example, results from a research study indicated that people who had dementia with agitation had a slightly lower rate of blood pressure problems when they took Drug A compared to when they took Drug B. In the study analysis, these results were not considered to be statistically significant because p=0.2. The probability that the results were due to chance was high enough to conclude that the two drugs probably did not differ in causing blood pressure problems.

You can find it here.  First of all, one should never use “likelihood” and “probability” in what is to be a clarification of formal terms, as these mean very different things in statistics.Some of the claims given actually aren’t so bad if “likely” takes its statistical meaning, but are all wet if construed as mathematical probability.

What really puzzles me is, how do they expect readers to understand the claims that appear within this definition? Are their meanings known to anyone? Watch:

Statistical Significance

  1. A mathematical technique to measure whether the results of a study are likely to be true.

What does it mean to say “the results of a study are likely to be true”?

  1. Statistical significance is calculated as the probability that an effect observed in a research study is occurring because of chance.

Meaning?

  1. Statistical significance is usually expressed as a P-value.
  2. The smaller the P-value, the less likely it is that the results are due to chance (and more likely that the results are true).

How should we define “more likely that the results are true”?

  1. Researchers generally believe the results are probably true if the statistical significance is a P-value less than 0.05 (p<.05).

oy, oy

  1. The probability that the results were due to chance was high enough to conclude that the two drugs probably did not differ in causing blood pressure problems.

Oy, oy, oy OK, I’ll turn this into a single “oy” and just suggest dropping “probably” (leaving the hypertext “probability”). But this was part of the illustration, not the definition.

Surely it’s possible to keep to their brevity and do a better job than this, even though one would really want to explain about the types of null hypotheses, the test statistic, the assumptions of the test (we aren’t told if their example is an RCT.)  I’ve listed how they might capture what I think they mean to say, off the top of my head. Submit your improvements, corrections and additions, and I’ll add them. Updates will be indicated with (ii), (iii), etc.

Statistical Significance

  1. A mathematical technique to measure whether the results of a study are likely to be true.
    a) A statistical technique to measure whether the results of a study indicate the null hypothesis is false, that some genuine discrepancy from the null hypothesis exists.
  1. Statistical significance is calculated as the probability that an effect observed in a research study is occurring because of chance.
    a) The statistical significance of an observed difference is the probability of observing results as large as was observed, even if the null hypothesis is true.
    b) The statistical significance of an observed difference is how frequently even larger differences than were observed would occur (through chance variability), even if the null hypothesis is true.
  1. Statistical significance is usually expressed as a P-value.
    a) Statistical significance may be expressed as a P-value associated with an observed difference from a null hypothesis H0 within a given statistical test T.
  1. The smaller the P-value, the less likely it is that the results are due to chance (and more likely that the results are true).
    a) The smaller the P-value, the less consistent the results are with the null hypothesis, and the more consistent they are with a genuine discrepancy from the null.
  1. Researchers generally believe the results are probably true if the statistical significance is a P-value less than 0.05 (p<.05).
    a) Researchers generally regard the results as inconsistent with the null if statistical significance is less than 0.05 (p<.05).
  1. (Part of the illustrative example): The probability that the results were due to chance was high enough to conclude that the two drugs probably did not differ in causing blood pressure problems.
    a) The probability that even larger differences would occur due to chance variability (even if the null is true) is high enough to regard the result as consistent with the null being true.

7/17/15 remark: Maybe there’s a convention in this glossary that if the word is not in hypertext, it is being used informally. In that case, this might not be so bad. I’d remove “probably” to get:

b) The probability that the results were due to chance was high enough to conclude that the two drugs did not differ in causing blood pressure problems.

7/17/15: In (ii) In reaction to a comment,  I replaced dobs with “observed difference”, and cut out Pr(d ≥ dobs ;H0). I also allowed that #6 wasn’t too bad, especially if (the non-hypertext) “probably” is removed. The only thing is, this was not part of the definition, but rather the illustration. So maybe this could be the basis for fixing the others in the definition itself.  

 

Categories: P-values, Statistics | 68 Comments

Spot the power howler: α = ß?

Spot the fallacy!

  1. METABLOG QUERYThe power of a test is the probability of correctly rejecting the null hypothesis. Write it as 1 – β.
  2. So, the probability of incorrectly rejecting the null hypothesis is β.
  3. But the probability of incorrectly rejecting the null is α (the type 1 error probability).

So α = β.

I’ve actually seen this, and variants on it [i].

[1] Although they didn’t go so far as to reach the final, shocking, deduction.

 

Categories: Error Statistics, power, Statistics | 12 Comments

Larry Laudan: “When the ‘Not-Guilty’ Falsely Pass for Innocent”, the Frequency of False Acquittals (guest post)

Larry Laudan

Larry Laudan

Professor Larry Laudan
Lecturer in Law and Philosophy
University of Texas at Austin

“When the ‘Not-Guilty’ Falsely Pass for Innocent” by Larry Laudan

While it is a belief deeply ingrained in the legal community (and among the public) that false negatives are much more common than false positives (a 10:1 ratio being the preferred guess), empirical studies of that question are very few and far between. While false convictions have been carefully investigated in more than two dozen studies, there are virtually no well-designed studies of the frequency of false acquittals. The disinterest in the latter question is dramatically borne out by looking at discussions among intellectuals of the two sorts of errors. (A search of Google Books identifies some 6.3k discussions of the former and only 144 treatments of the latter in the period from 1800 to now.) I’m persuaded that it is time we brought false negatives out of the shadows, not least because each such mistake carries significant potential harms, typically inflicted by falsely-acquitted recidivists who are on the streets instead of in prison.scot-free-1_1024x1024

 

In criminal law, false negatives occur under two circumstances: when a guilty defendant is acquitted at trial and when an arrested, guilty defendant has the charges against him dropped or dismissed by the judge or prosecutor. Almost no one tries to measure how often either type of false negative occurs. That is partly understandable, given the fact that the legal system prohibits a judicial investigation into the correctness of an acquittal at trial; the double jeopardy principle guarantees that such acquittals are fixed in stone. Thanks in no small part to the general societal indifference to false negatives, there have been virtually no efforts to design empirical studies that would yield reliable figures on false acquittals. That means that my efforts here to estimate how often they occur must depend on a plethora of indirect indicators. With a bit of ingenuity, it is possible to find data that provide strong clues as to approximately how often a truly guilty defendant is acquitted at trial and in the pre-trial process. The resulting inferences are not precise and I will try to explain why as we go along. As we look at various data sources not initially designed to measure false negatives, we will see that they nonetheless provide salient information about when and why false acquittals occur, thereby enabling us to make an approximate estimate of their frequency.

My discussion of how to estimate the frequency of false negatives will fall into two parts, reflecting the stark differences between the sources of errors in pleas and the sources of error in trials. (All the data to be cited here deal entirely with cases of crimes of violence.) Continue reading

Categories: evidence-based policy, false negatives, PhilStatLaw, Statistics | Tags: | 9 Comments

Stapel’s Fix for Science? Admit the story you want to tell and how you “fixed” the statistics to support it!

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Stapel’s “fix” for science is to admit it’s all “fixed!”

That recent case of the guy suspected of using faked data for a study on how to promote support for gay marriage in a (retracted) paper, Michael LaCour, is directing a bit of limelight on our star fraudster Diederik Stapel (50+ retractions).

The Chronicle of Higher Education just published an article by Tom Bartlett:Can a Longtime Fraud Help Fix Science? You can read his full interview of Stapel here. A snippet:

You write that “every psychologist has a toolbox of statistical and methodological procedures for those days when the numbers don’t turn out quite right.” Do you think every psychologist uses that toolbox? In other words, is everyone at least a little bit dirty?

Stapel: In essence, yes. The universe doesn’t give answers. There are no data matrices out there. We have to select from reality, and we have to interpret. There’s always dirt, and there’s always selection, and there’s always interpretation. That doesn’t mean it’s all untruthful. We’re dirty because we can only live with models of reality rather than reality itself. It doesn’t mean it’s all a bag of tricks and lies. But that’s where the inconvenience starts. Continue reading

Categories: junk science, Statistics | 11 Comments

Can You change Your Bayesian prior? (ii)

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This is one of the questions high on the “To Do” list I’ve been keeping for this blog.  The question grew out of discussions of “updating and downdating” in relation to papers by Stephen Senn (2011) and Andrew Gelman (2011) in Rationality, Markets, and Morals.[i]

“As an exercise in mathematics [computing a posterior based on the client’s prior probabilities] is not superior to showing the client the data, eliciting a posterior distribution and then calculating the prior distribution; as an exercise in inference Bayesian updating does not appear to have greater claims than ‘downdating’.” (Senn, 2011, p. 59)

“If you could really express your uncertainty as a prior distribution, then you could just as well observe data and directly write your subjective posterior distribution, and there would be no need for statistical analysis at all.” (Gelman, 2011, p. 77)

But if uncertainty is not expressible as a prior, then a major lynchpin for Bayesian updating seems questionable. If you can go from the posterior to the prior, on the other hand, perhaps it can also lead you to come back and change it.

Is it legitimate to change one’s prior based on the data?

I don’t mean update it, but reject the one you had and replace it with another. My question may yield different answers depending on the particular Bayesian view. I am prepared to restrict the entire question of changing priors to Bayesian “probabilisms”, meaning the inference takes the form of updating priors to yield posteriors, or to report a comparative Bayes factor. Interpretations can vary. In many Bayesian accounts the prior probability distribution is a way of introducing prior beliefs into the analysis (as with subjective Bayesians) or, conversely, to avoid introducing prior beliefs (as with reference or conventional priors). Empirical Bayesians employ frequentist priors based on similar studies or well established theory. There are many other variants.

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S. SENN: According to Senn, one test of whether an approach is Bayesian is that while Continue reading

Categories: Bayesian/frequentist, Gelman, S. Senn, Statistics | 111 Comments

What Would Replication Research Under an Error Statistical Philosophy Be?

f1ce127a4cfe95c4f645f0cc98f04fcaAround a year ago on this blog I wrote:

“There are some ironic twists in the way psychology is dealing with its replication crisis that may well threaten even the most sincere efforts to put the field on firmer scientific footing”

That’s philosopher’s talk for “I see a rich source of problems that cry out for ministrations of philosophers of science and of statistics”. Yesterday, I began my talk at the Society for Philosophy and Psychology workshop on “Replication in the Sciences”with examples of two main philosophical tasks: to clarify concepts, and reveal inconsistencies, tensions and ironies surrounding methodological “discomforts” in scientific practice.

Example of a conceptual clarification 

Editors of a journal, Basic and Applied Social Psychology, announced they are banning statistical hypothesis testing because it is “invalid” (A puzzle about the latest “test ban”)

It’s invalid because it does not supply “the probability of the null hypothesis, given the finding” (the posterior probability of H0) (2015 Trafimow and Marks)

  • Since the methodology of testing explicitly rejects the mode of inference they don’t supply, it would be incorrect to claim the methods were invalid.
  • Simple conceptual job that philosophers are good at

(I don’t know if the group of eminent statisticians assigned to react to the “test ban” will bring up this point. I don’t think it includes any philosophers.)

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

Example of revealing inconsistencies and tensions 

Critic: It’s too easy to satisfy standard significance thresholds

You: Why do replicationists find it so hard to achieve significance thresholds?

Critic: Obviously the initial studies were guilty of p-hacking, cherry-picking, significance seeking, QRPs

You: So, the replication researchers want methods that pick up on and block these biasing selection effects.

Critic: Actually the “reforms” recommend methods where selection effects and data dredging make no difference.

________________________________________________________________

Whether this can be resolved or not is separate.

  • We are constantly hearing of how the “reward structure” leads to taking advantage of researcher flexibility
  • As philosophers, we can at least show how to hold their feet to the fire, and warn of the perils of accounts that bury the finagling

The philosopher is the curmudgeon (takes chutzpah!)

I also think it’s crucial for philosophers of science and statistics to show how to improve on and solve problems of methodology in scientific practice.

My slides are below; share comments.

Categories: Error Statistics, reproducibility, Statistics | 18 Comments

“Intentions” is the new code word for “error probabilities”: Allan Birnbaum’s Birthday

27 May 1923-1 July 1976

27 May 1923-1 July 1976

Today is Allan Birnbaum’s Birthday. Birnbaum’s (1962) classic “On the Foundations of Statistical Inference,” in Breakthroughs in Statistics (volume I 1993), concerns a principle that remains at the heart of today’s controversies in statistics–even if it isn’t obvious at first: the Likelihood Principle (LP) (also called the strong likelihood Principle SLP, to distinguish it from the weak LP [1]). According to the LP/SLP, given the statistical model, the information from the data are fully contained in the likelihood ratio. Thus, properties of the sampling distribution of the test statistic vanish (as I put it in my slides from my last post)! But error probabilities are all properties of the sampling distribution. Thus, embracing the LP (SLP) blocks our error statistician’s direct ways of taking into account “biasing selection effects” (slide #10).

Intentions is a New Code Word: Where, then, is all the information regarding your trying and trying again, stopping when the data look good, cherry picking, barn hunting and data dredging? For likelihoodists and other probabilists who hold the LP/SLP, it is ephemeral information locked in your head reflecting your “intentions”!  “Intentions” is a code word for “error probabilities” in foundational discussions, as in “who would want to take intentions into account?” (Replace “intentions” (or the “researcher’s intentions”) with “error probabilities” (or the method’s error probabilities”) and you get a more accurate picture.) Keep this deciphering tool firmly in mind as you read criticisms of methods that take error probabilities into account[2]. For error statisticians, this information reflects real and crucial properties of your inference procedure.

Continue reading

Categories: Birnbaum, Birnbaum Brakes, frequentist/Bayesian, Likelihood Principle, phil/history of stat, Statistics | 48 Comments

From our “Philosophy of Statistics” session: APS 2015 convention

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“The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference,” at the 2015 American Psychological Society (APS) Annual Convention in NYC, May 23, 2015:

 

D. Mayo: “Error Statistical Control: Forfeit at your Peril” 

 

S. Senn: “‘Repligate’: reproducibility in statistical studies. What does it mean and in what sense does it matter?”

 

A. Gelman: “The statistical crisis in science” (this is not his exact presentation, but he focussed on some of these slides)

 

For more details see this post.

Categories: Bayesian/frequentist, Error Statistics, P-values, reforming the reformers, reproducibility, S. Senn, Statistics | 10 Comments

Stephen Senn: Double Jeopardy?: Judge Jeffreys Upholds the Law (sequel to the pathetic P-value)

S. Senn

S. Senn

Stephen Senn
Head of Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health

Double Jeopardy?: Judge Jeffreys Upholds the Law

“But this could be dealt with in a rough empirical way by taking twice the standard error as a criterion for possible genuineness and three times the standard error for definite acceptance”. Harold Jeffreys(1) (p386)

This is the second of two posts on P-values. In the first, The Pathetic P-Value, I considered the relation of P-values to Laplace’s Bayesian formulation of induction, pointing out that that P-values, whilst they had a very different interpretation, were numerically very similar to a type of Bayesian posterior probability. In this one, I consider their relation or lack of it, to Harold Jeffreys’s radically different approach to significance testing. (An excellent account of the development of Jeffreys’s thought is given by Howie(2), which I recommend highly.)

The story starts with Cambridge philosopher CD Broad (1887-1971), who in 1918 pointed to a difficulty with Laplace’s Law of Succession. Broad considers the problem of drawing counters from an urn containing n counters and supposes that all m drawn had been observed to be white. He now considers two very different questions, which have two very different probabilities and writes:

C.D. Broad quoteNote that in the case that only one counter remains we have n = m + 1 and the two probabilities are the same. However, if n > m+1 they are not the same and in particular if m is large but n is much larger, the first probability can approach 1 whilst the second remains small.

The practical implication of this just because Bayesian induction implies that a large sequence of successes (and no failures) supports belief that the next trial will be a success, it does not follow that one should believe that all future trials will be so. This distinction is often misunderstood. This is The Economist getting it wrong in September 2000

The canonical example is to imagine that a precocious newborn observes his first sunset, and wonders whether the sun will rise again or not. He assigns equal prior probabilities to both possible outcomes, and represents this by placing one white and one black marble into a bag. The following day, when the sun rises, the child places another white marble in the bag. The probability that a marble plucked randomly from the bag will be white (ie, the child’s degree of belief in future sunrises) has thus gone from a half to two-thirds. After sunrise the next day, the child adds another white marble, and the probability (and thus the degree of belief) goes from two-thirds to three-quarters. And so on. Gradually, the initial belief that the sun is just as likely as not to rise each morning is modified to become a near-certainty that the sun will always rise.

See Dicing with Death(3) (pp76-78).

The practical relevance of this is that scientific laws cannot be established by Laplacian induction. Jeffreys (1891-1989) puts it thus

Thus I may have seen 1 in 1000 of the ‘animals with feathers’ in England; on Laplace’s theory the probability of the proposition, ‘all animals with feathers have beaks’, would be about 1/1000. This does not correspond to my state of belief or anybody else’s. (P128)

Continue reading

Categories: Jeffreys, P-values, reforming the reformers, Statistics, Stephen Senn | 41 Comments

Spurious Correlations: Death by getting tangled in bedsheets and the consumption of cheese! (Aris Spanos)

Spanos

Spanos

These days, there are so many dubious assertions about alleged correlations between two variables that an entire website: Spurious Correlation (Tyler Vigen) is devoted to exposing (and creating*) them! A classic problem is that the means of variables X and Y may both be trending in the order data are observed, invalidating the assumption that their means are constant. In my initial study with Aris Spanos on misspecification testing, the X and Y means were trending in much the same way I imagine a lot of the examples on this site are––like the one on the number of people who die by becoming tangled in their bedsheets and the per capita consumption of cheese in the U.S.

The annual data for 2000-2009 are: xt: per capita consumption of cheese (U.S.) : x = (29.8, 30.1, 30.5, 30.6, 31.3, 31.7, 32.6, 33.1, 32.7, 32.8); yt: Number of people who died by becoming tangled in their bedsheets: y = (327, 456, 509, 497, 596, 573, 661, 741, 809, 717)

I asked Aris Spanos to have a look, and it took him no time to identify the main problem. He was good enough to write up a short note which I’ve pasted as slides.

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Aris Spanos

Wilson E. Schmidt Professor of Economics
Department of Economics, Virginia Tech

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*The site says that the server attempts to generate a new correlation every 60 seconds.

Categories: misspecification testing, Spanos, Statistics, Testing Assumptions | 14 Comments

96% Error in “Expert” Testimony Based on Probability of Hair Matches: It’s all Junk!

Objectivity 1: Will the Real Junk Science Please Stand Up?Imagine. The New York Times reported a few days ago that the FBI erroneously identified criminals 96% of the time based on probability assessments using forensic hair samples (up until 2000). Sometimes the hair wasn’t even human, it might have come from a dog, a cat or a fur coat!  I posted on  the unreliability of hair forensics a few years ago.  The forensics of bite marks aren’t much better.[i] John Byrd, forensic analyst and reader of this blog had commented at the time that: “At the root of it is the tradition of hiring non-scientists into the technical positions in the labs. They tended to be agents. That explains a lot about misinterpretation of the weight of evidence and the inability to explain the import of lab findings in court.” DNA is supposed to cure all that. So is it? I don’t know, but apparently the FBI “has agreed to provide free DNA testing where there is either a court order or a request for testing by the prosecution.”[ii] See the FBI report.

Here’s the op-ed from the New York Times from April 27, 2015:

Junk Science at the FBI”

The odds were 10-million-to-one, the prosecution said, against hair strands found at the scene of a 1978 murder of a Washington, D.C., taxi driver belonging to anyone but Santae Tribble. Based largely on this compelling statistic, drawn from the testimony of an analyst with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Mr. Tribble, 17 at the time, was convicted of the crime and sentenced to 20 years to life.

But the hair did not belong to Mr. Tribble. Some of it wasn’t even human. In 2012, a judge vacated Mr. Tribble’s conviction and dismissed the charges against him when DNA testing showed there was no match between the hair samples, and that one strand had come from a dog.

Mr. Tribble’s case — along with the exoneration of two other men who served decades in prison based on faulty hair-sample analysis — spurred the F.B.I. to conduct a sweeping post-conviction review of 2,500 cases in which its hair-sample lab reported a match.

The preliminary results of that review, which Spencer Hsu of The Washington Post reported last week, are breathtaking: out of 268 criminal cases nationwide between 1985 and 1999, the bureau’s “elite” forensic hair-sample analysts testified wrongly in favor of the prosecution, in 257, or 96 percent of the time. Thirty-two defendants in those cases were sentenced to death; 14 have since been executed or died in prison.Forensic Hair red

The agency is continuing to review the rest of the cases from the pre-DNA era. The Justice Department is working with the Innocence Project and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to notify the defendants in those cases that they may have grounds for an appeal. It cannot, however, address the thousands of additional cases where potentially flawed testimony came from one of the 500 to 1,000 state or local analysts trained by the F.B.I. Peter Neufeld, co-founder of the Innocence Project, rightly called this a “complete disaster.”

Law enforcement agencies have long known of the dubious value of hair-sample analysis. A 2009 report by the National Research Council found “no scientific support” and “no uniform standards” for the method’s use in positively identifying a suspect. At best, hair-sample analysis can rule out a suspect, or identify a wide class of people with similar characteristics.

Yet until DNA testing became commonplace in the late 1990s, forensic analysts testified confidently to the near-certainty of matches between hair found at crime scenes and samples taken from defendants. The F.B.I. did not even have written standards on how analysts should testify about their findings until 2012.

Continue reading

Categories: evidence-based policy, junk science, PhilStat Law, Statistics | 3 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (APRIL 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

* 3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: March 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog* (Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils” count as one.) This new feature, appearing the last week of each month, began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

*excluding those recently reblogged.

April 2012

Contributions from readers in relation to published papers

Two book reviews of Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge (EGEK 1996)-counted as 1 unit

Categories: 3-year memory lane, Statistics | Tags: | Leave a comment

“Statistical Concepts in Their Relation to Reality” by E.S. Pearson

To complete the last post, here’s Pearson’s portion of the “triad” 

E.S.Pearson on Gate

E.S.Pearson on Gate (sketch by D. Mayo)

“Statistical Concepts in Their Relation to Reality”

by E.S. PEARSON (1955)

SUMMARY: This paper contains a reply to some criticisms made by Sir Ronald Fisher in his recent article on “Scientific Methods and Scientific Induction”.

Controversies in the field of mathematical statistics seem largely to have arisen because statisticians have been unable to agree upon how theory is to provide, in terms of probability statements, the numerical measures most helpful to those who have to draw conclusions from observational data.  We are concerned here with the ways in which mathematical theory may be put, as it were, into gear with the common processes of rational thought, and there seems no reason to suppose that there is one best way in which this can be done.  If, therefore, Sir Ronald Fisher recapitulates and enlarges on his views upon statistical methods and scientific induction we can all only be grateful, but when he takes this opportunity to criticize the work of others through misapprehension of their views as he has done in his recent contribution to this Journal (Fisher 1955), it is impossible to leave him altogether unanswered.

In the first place it seems unfortunate that much of Fisher’s criticism of Neyman and Pearson’s approach to the testing of statistical hypotheses should be built upon a “penetrating observation” ascribed to Professor G.A. Barnard, the assumption involved in which happens to be historically incorrect.  There was no question of a difference in point of view having “originated” when Neyman “reinterpreted” Fisher’s early work on tests of significance “in terms of that technological and commercial apparatus which is known as an acceptance procedure”.  There was no sudden descent upon British soil of Russian ideas regarding the function of science in relation to technology and to five-year plans.  It was really much simpler–or worse.  The original heresy, as we shall see, was a Pearson one!

TO CONTINUE READING E.S. PEARSON’S PAPER CLICK HERE.

Categories: E.S. Pearson, phil/history of stat, Statistics | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

NEYMAN: “Note on an Article by Sir Ronald Fisher” (3 uses for power, Fisher’s fiducial argument)

Note on an Article by Sir Ronald Fisher

By Jerzy Neyman (1956)

Summary

(1) FISHER’S allegation that, contrary to some passages in the introduction and on the cover of the book by Wald, this book does not really deal with experimental design is unfounded. In actual fact, the book is permeated with problems of experimentation.  (2) Without consideration of hypotheses alternative to the one under test and without the study of probabilities of the two kinds, no purely probabilistic theory of tests is possible.  (3) The conceptual fallacy of the notion of fiducial distribution rests upon the lack of recognition that valid probability statements about random variables usually cease to be valid if the random variables are replaced by their particular values.  The notorious multitude of “paradoxes” of fiducial theory is a consequence of this oversight.  (4)  The idea of a “cost function for faulty judgments” appears to be due to Laplace, followed by Gauss.

1. Introduction

In a recent article (Fisher, 1955), Sir Ronald Fisher delivered an attack on a a substantial part of the research workers in mathematical statistics. My name is mentioned more frequently than any other and is accompanied by the more expressive invectives. Of the scientific questions raised by Fisher many were sufficiently discussed before (Neyman and Pearson, 1933; Neyman, 1937; Neyman, 1952). In the present note only the following points will be considered: (i) Fisher’s attack on the concept of errors of the second kind; (ii) Fisher’s reference to my objections to fiducial probability; (iii) Fisher’s reference to the origin of the concept of loss function and, before all, (iv) Fisher’s attack on Abraham Wald.

THIS SHORT (5 page) NOTE IS NEYMAN’S PORTION OF WHAT I CALL THE “TRIAD”. LET ME POINT YOU TO THE TOP HALF OF p. 291, AND THE DISCUSSION OF FIDUCIAL INFERENCE ON p. 292 HERE.


Categories: Fisher, Neyman, phil/history of stat, Statistics | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

neyman

Neyman, drawn by ?

Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena” by Jerzy Neyman

ABSTRACT. Contrary to ideas suggested by the title of the conference at which the present paper was presented, the author is not aware of a conceptual difference between a “test of a statistical hypothesis” and a “test of significance” and uses these terms interchangeably. A study of any serious substantive problem involves a sequence of incidents at which one is forced to pause and consider what to do next. In an effort to reduce the frequency of misdirected activities one uses statistical tests. The procedure is illustrated on two examples: (i) Le Cam’s (and associates’) study of immunotherapy of cancer and (ii) a socio-economic experiment relating to low-income homeownership problems.

I hadn’t posted this paper of Neyman’s before, so here’s something for your weekend reading:  “Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena.”  I recommend, especially, the example on home ownership. Here are two snippets:

1. INTRODUCTION

The title of the present session involves an element that appears mysterious to me. This element is the apparent distinction between tests of statistical hypotheses, on the one hand, and tests of significance, on the other. If this is not a lapse of someone’s pen, then I hope to learn the conceptual distinction. Continue reading

Categories: Error Statistics, Neyman, Statistics | Tags: | 18 Comments

A. Spanos: Jerzy Neyman and his Enduring Legacy

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A Statistical Model as a Chance Mechanism
Aris Spanos 

Today is the birthday of Jerzy Neyman (April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981). Neyman was a Polish/American statistician[i] who spent most of his professional career at the University of California, Berkeley. Neyman is best known in statistics for his pioneering contributions in framing the Neyman-Pearson (N-P) optimal theory of hypothesis testing and his theory of Confidence Intervals. (This article was first posted here.)

Neyman: 16 April

Neyman: 16 April 1894 – 5 Aug 1981

One of Neyman’s most remarkable, but least recognized, achievements was his adapting of Fisher’s (1922) notion of a statistical model to render it pertinent for  non-random samples. Fisher’s original parametric statistical model Mθ(x) was based on the idea of ‘a hypothetical infinite population’, chosen so as to ensure that the observed data x0:=(x1,x2,…,xn) can be viewed as a ‘truly representative sample’ from that ‘population’:

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Fisher and Neyman

“The postulate of randomness thus resolves itself into the question, Of what population is this a random sample? (ibid., p. 313), underscoring that: the adequacy of our choice may be tested a posteriori.’’ (p. 314)

In cases where data x0 come from sample surveys or it can be viewed as a typical realization of a random sample X:=(X1,X2,…,Xn), i.e. Independent and Identically Distributed (IID) random variables, the ‘population’ metaphor can be helpful in adding some intuitive appeal to the inductive dimension of statistical inference, because one can imagine using a subset of a population (the sample) to draw inferences pertaining to the whole population. Continue reading

Categories: Neyman, phil/history of stat, Spanos, Statistics | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

Start Spreading the News…..

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 The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference,
2015 APS Annual Convention
Saturday, May 23  
2:00 PM- 3:50 PM in Wilder

(Marriott Marquis 1535 B’way)

 

 

gelman5

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Andrew Gelman

Professor of Statistics & Political Science
Columbia University

SENN FEB

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Stephen Senn

Head of Competence Center
for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)

Luxembourg Institute of Health

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Slide1

D. Mayo headshot

D.G. Mayo, Philosopher


morey

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Richard Morey, Session Chair & Discussant

Senior Lecturer
School of Psychology
Cardiff University
Categories: Announcement, Bayesian/frequentist, Statistics | 8 Comments

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