Posts Tagged With: Linear regression

Phil 6334: Misspecification Testing: Ordering From A Full Diagnostic Menu (part 1)

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 We’re going to be discussing the philosophy of m-s testing today in our seminar, so I’m reblogging this from Feb. 2012. I’ve linked the 3 follow-ups below. Check the original posts for some good discussion. (Note visitor*)

“This is the kind of cure that kills the patient!”

is the line of Aris Spanos that I most remember from when I first heard him talk about testing assumptions of, and respecifying, statistical models in 1999.  (The patient, of course, is the statistical model.) On finishing my book, EGEK 1996, I had been keen to fill its central gaps one of which was fleshing out a crucial piece of the error-statistical framework of learning from error: How to validate the assumptions of statistical models. But the whole problem turned out to be far more philosophically—not to mention technically—challenging than I imagined. I will try (in 3 short posts) to sketch a procedure that I think puts the entire process of model validation on a sound logical footing. Continue reading

Categories: Intro MS Testing, Statistics | Tags: , , , , | 16 Comments

Intro to Misspecification Testing: Ordering From A Full Diagnostic Menu (part 1)

 

“This is the kind of cure that kills the patient!”

is the line of Aris Spanos that I most remember from when I first heard him talk about testing assumptions of, and respecifying, statistical models in 1999.  (The patient, of course, is the statistical model.) On finishing my book, EGEK 1996, I had been keen to fill its central gaps one of which was fleshing out a crucial piece of the error-statistical framework of learning from error: How to validate the assumptions of statistical models. But the whole problem turned out to be far more philosophically—not to mention technically—challenging than I imagined.I will try (in 3 short posts) to sketch a procedure that I think puts the entire process of model validation on a sound logical footing.  Thanks to attending several of Spanos’ seminars (and his patient tutorials, for which I am very grateful), I was eventually able to reflect philosophically on aspects of  his already well-worked out approach. (Synergies with the error statistical philosophy, of which this is a part,  warrant a separate discussion.)

Continue reading

Categories: Intro MS Testing, Statistics | Tags: , , , , | 20 Comments

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