AUTUMN SEMINARS: Contemporary Philosophy of Statistics


Contemporary Philosophy of Statistics (Autumn Seminars):

30 November:
Seminar participants: Some people indicated they wanted some general background: See the Slides from the first summer seminar and the contributions to the special on-line volume:
http://www.rmm-journal.de/htdocs/st01.html(I may attach these to the group over the weekend).

The blog can also be searched.  If you write to me with specific questions and interests over the next few days, I can direct you to appropriate, short (hopefully) readings or summaries.

Thanks for your interest. D. Mayo
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Seminar 1: 28 November, 2012

Mayo: “On Birnbaum’s argument for the Likelihood Principle: A 50-year old error and its influence on statistical foundations”
PH500 Seminar, Room: Lak 2.06 (Lakatos building). 
London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

BACKGROUND READING: PAPER

For summary in the form of slides, see here.

_______________

FOR RELATED LINKS SEE THE BLOG POSTS:

https://errorstatistics.com/2012/11/07/seminars-at-the-london-school-of-economics-contemporary-problems-in-philosophy-of-statistics/

https://errorstatistics.com/2012/10/31/u-phil-blogging-the-likelihood-principle-new-summary/

OTHER  PAPERS THAT MAY BE OF INTEREST:

Birnbaum, A. (1962), “On the Foundations of Statistical Inference“, Journal of the American Statistical Association 57 (298), 269-306.

Savage, L. J., Barnard, G., Cornfield, J., Bross, I, Box, G., Good, I., Lindley, D., Clunies-Ross, C., Pratt, J., Levene, H., Goldman, T., Dempster, A., Kempthorne, O, and Birnbaum, A. (1962). On the foundations of statistical inference: “Discussion (of Birnbaum 1962)”,  Journal of the American Statistical Association 57 (298), 307-326.

Birbaum, A (1970). Statistical Methods in Scientific Inference  (letter to the editor). Nature 225, 1033.

Cox D. R. and Mayo. D. (2010). “Objectivity and Conditionality in Frequentist Inference” in Error and Inference: Recent Exchanges on Experimental Reasoning, Reliability and the Objectivity and Rationality of Science (D Mayo & A. Spanos eds.), CUP 276-304.

_____________________________

Autumn 2012 update

LSE PH500 Seminars (3) on Contemporary Issues in the Philosophical Foundations of Statistical Science
I will be holding 3 seminars on philosophical foundations of statistics on Wednesday’s between Nov. 26 and Dec. 12:

The London School of Economics: CPNSS: Lak 2.06 (Lakatos Building).

It is not necessary to have attended the 2 sessions held during the summer of 2012*.  In addition to the philosopher of statistics (me!), the Autumn seminars will feature distinguished guest statisticians: Sir David Cox (Oxford); Dr. Stephen Senn: (Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics, Luxembourg); Dr. Christian Hennig (University College, London) Other guests are possible.

Interested Masters students are invited (please write error@vt.edu if interested, OK to come when can).

28 November (Mayo):

On Birnbaum’s argument for the Likelihood Principle: A 50-year old error and its influence on statistical foundations (Background: See my blog and links within).

5 Dec and 12 Dec: Statistical science meets philosophy of science (Mayo and guests):

Sir David Cox (Statistics, Oxford) Wed. Dec 5: 12-2 p.m.

Dr. Stephen Senn (Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics, Luxembourg) Wed. Dec 12: 10-12 a.m.

Dr. Christian Hennig  (University College, London) TBA

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