Monthly Archives: April 2017

S. Senn: “Automatic for the people? Not quite” (Guest post)

Stephen Senn

Stephen Senn
Head of  Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health
Twitter @stephensenn

Automatic for the people? Not quite

What caught my eye was the estimable (in its non-statistical meaning) Richard Lehman tweeting about the equally estimable John Ioannidis. For those who don’t know them, the former is a veteran blogger who keeps a very cool and shrewd eye on the latest medical ‘breakthroughs’ and the latter a serial iconoclast of idols of scientific method. This is what Lehman wrote

Ioannidis hits 8 on the Richter scale: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0173184 … Bayes factors consistently quantify strength of evidence, p is valueless.

Since Ioannidis works at Stanford, which is located in the San Francisco Bay Area, he has every right to be interested in earthquakes but on looking up the paper in question, a faint tremor is the best that I can afford it. I shall now try and explain why, but before I do, it is only fair that I acknowledge the very generous, prompt and extensive help I have been given to understand the paper[1] in question by its two authors Don van Ravenzwaaij and Ioannidis himself. Continue reading

Categories: Bayesian/frequentist, Error Statistics, S. Senn | 18 Comments

The Fourth Bayesian, Fiducial and Frequentist Workshop (BFF4): Harvard U

 

May 1-3, 2017
Hilles Event Hall, 59 Shepard St. MA

The Department of Statistics is pleased to announce the 4th Bayesian, Fiducial and Frequentist Workshop (BFF4), to be held on May 1-3, 2017 at Harvard University. The BFF workshop series celebrates foundational thinking in statistics and inference under uncertainty. The three-day event will present talks, discussions and panels that feature statisticians and philosophers whose research interests synergize at the interface of their respective disciplines. Confirmed featured speakers include Sir David Cox and Stephen Stigler.

The program will open with a featured talk by Art Dempster and discussion by Glenn Shafer. The featured banquet speaker will be Stephen Stigler. Confirmed speakers include:

Featured Speakers and DiscussantsArthur Dempster (Harvard); Cynthia Dwork (Harvard); Andrew Gelman (Columbia); Ned Hall (Harvard); Deborah Mayo (Virginia Tech); Nancy Reid (Toronto); Susanna Rinard (Harvard); Christian Robert (Paris-Dauphine/Warwick); Teddy Seidenfeld (CMU); Glenn Shafer (Rutgers); Stephen Senn (LIH); Stephen Stigler (Chicago); Sandy Zabell (Northwestern)

Invited Speakers and PanelistsJim Berger (Duke); Emery Brown (MIT/MGH); Larry Brown (Wharton); David Cox (Oxford; remote participation); Paul Edlefsen (Hutch); Don Fraser (Toronto); Ruobin Gong (Harvard); Jan Hannig (UNC); Alfred Hero (Michigan); Nils Hjort (Oslo); Pierre Jacob (Harvard); Keli Liu (Stanford); Regina Liu (Rutgers); Antonietta Mira (USI); Ryan Martin (NC State); Vijay Nair (Michigan); James Robins (Harvard); Daniel Roy (Toronto); Donald B. Rubin (Harvard); Peter XK Song (Michigan); Gunnar Taraldsen (NUST); Tyler VanderWeele (HSPH); Vladimir Vovk (London); Nanny Wermuth (Chalmers/Gutenberg); Min-ge Xie (Rutgers)

Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, Bayesian/frequentist | 2 Comments

Jerzy Neyman and “Les Miserables Citations” (statistical theater in honor of his birthday)

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Neyman April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981

For my final Jerzy Neyman item, here’s the post I wrote for his birthday last year: 

A local acting group is putting on a short theater production based on a screenplay I wrote:  “Les Miserables Citations” (“Those Miserable Quotes”) [1]. The “miserable” citations are those everyone loves to cite, from their early joint 1933 paper:

We are inclined to think that as far as a particular hypothesis is concerned, no test based upon the theory of probability can by itself provide any valuable evidence of the truth or falsehood of that hypothesis.

But we may look at the purpose of tests from another viewpoint. Without hoping to know whether each separate hypothesis is true or false, we may search for rules to govern our behavior with regard to them, in following which we insure that, in the long run of experience, we shall not be too often wrong. (Neyman and Pearson 1933, pp. 290-1).

In this early paper, Neyman and Pearson were still groping toward the basic concepts of tests–for example, “power” had yet to be coined. Taken out of context, these quotes have led to knee-jerk (behavioristic) interpretations which neither Neyman nor Pearson would have accepted. What was the real context of those passages? Well, the paper opens, just five paragraphs earlier, with a discussion of a debate between two French probabilists—Joseph Bertrand, author of “Calculus of Probabilities” (1907), and Emile Borel, author of “Le Hasard” (1914)! According to Neyman, what served “as an inspiration to Egon S. Pearson and myself in our effort to build a frequentist theory of testing hypotheses”(1977, p. 103) initially grew out of remarks of Borel, whose lectures Neyman had attended in Paris. He returns to the Bertrand-Borel debate in four different papers, and circles back to it often in his talks with his biographer, Constance Reid. His student Erich Lehmann (1993), regarded as the authority on Neyman, wrote an entire paper on the topic: “The Bertrand-Borel Debate and the Origins of the Neyman Pearson Theory”. Continue reading

Categories: E.S. Pearson, Neyman, Statistics | Leave a comment

Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

neyman

April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981

I’ll continue to post Neyman-related items this week in honor of his birthday. This isn’t the only paper in which Neyman makes it clear he denies a distinction between a test of  statistical hypotheses and significance tests. He and E. Pearson also discredit the myth that the former is only allowed to report pre-data, fixed error probabilities, and are justified only by dint of long-run error control. Controlling the “frequency of misdirected activities” in the midst of finding something out, or solving a problem of inquiry, on the other hand, are epistemological goals. What do you think?

Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena
by Jerzy Neyman

ABSTRACT. Contrary to ideas suggested by the title of the conference at which the present paper was presented, the author is not aware of a conceptual difference between a “test of a statistical hypothesis” and a “test of significance” and uses these terms interchangeably. A study of any serious substantive problem involves a sequence of incidents at which one is forced to pause and consider what to do next. In an effort to reduce the frequency of misdirected activities one uses statistical tests. The procedure is illustrated on two examples: (i) Le Cam’s (and associates’) study of immunotherapy of cancer and (ii) a socio-economic experiment relating to low-income homeownership problems.

I recommend, especially, the example on home ownership. Here are two snippets: Continue reading

Categories: Error Statistics, Neyman, Statistics | Tags: | 2 Comments

A. Spanos: Jerzy Neyman and his Enduring Legacy

Today is Jerzy Neyman’s birthday. I’ll post various Neyman items this week in honor of it, starting with a guest post by Aris Spanos. Happy Birthday Neyman!

A. Spanos

A Statistical Model as a Chance Mechanism
Aris Spanos 

Jerzy Neyman (April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981), was a Polish/American statistician[i] who spent most of his professional career at the University of California, Berkeley. Neyman is best known in statistics for his pioneering contributions in framing the Neyman-Pearson (N-P) optimal theory of hypothesis testing and his theory of Confidence Intervals. (This article was first posted here.)

Neyman: 16 April

Neyman: 16 April 1894 – 5 Aug 1981

One of Neyman’s most remarkable, but least recognized, achievements was his adapting of Fisher’s (1922) notion of a statistical model to render it pertinent for  non-random samples. Fisher’s original parametric statistical model Mθ(x) was based on the idea of ‘a hypothetical infinite population’, chosen so as to ensure that the observed data x0:=(x1,x2,…,xn) can be viewed as a ‘truly representative sample’ from that ‘population’:

“The postulate of randomness thus resolves itself into the question, Of what population is this a random sample? (ibid., p. 313), underscoring that: the adequacy of our choice may be tested a posteriori.’’ (p. 314) Continue reading

Categories: Neyman, Spanos | Leave a comment

If you’re seeing limb-sawing in P-value logic, you’re sawing off the limbs of reductio arguments

images-2I was just reading a paper by Martin and Liu (2014) in which they allude to the “questionable logic of proving H0 false by using a calculation that assumes it is true”(p. 1704).  They say they seek to define a notion of “plausibility” that

“fits the way practitioners use and interpret p-values: a small p-value means H0 is implausible, given the observed data,” but they seek “a probability calculation that does not require one to assume that H0 is true, so one avoids the questionable logic of proving H0 false by using a calculation that assumes it is true“(Martin and Liu 2014, p. 1704).

Questionable? A very standard form of argument is a reductio (ad absurdum) wherein a claim C  is inferred (i.e., detached) by falsifying ~C, that is, by showing that assuming ~C entails something in conflict with (if not logically contradicting) known results or known truths [i]. Actual falsification in science is generally a statistical variant of this argument. Supposing Hin p-value reasoning plays the role of ~C. Yet some aver it thereby “saws off its own limb”! Continue reading

Categories: P-values, reforming the reformers, Statistics | 13 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (MARCH 2014): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: March 2014. I mark in red three posts from each month that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog, excluding those reblogged recently[1], and in green up to 4 others I’d recommend[2].  Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group count as one. 3/19 and 3/17 are one, as are  3/19, 3/12 and 3/4, and the 6334 items 3/11, 3/22 and 3/26. So that covers nearly all the posts!

March 2014

 

  • (3/1) Cosma Shalizi gets tenure (at last!) (metastat announcement)
  • (3/2) Significance tests and frequentist principles of evidence: Phil6334 Day #6
  • (3/3) Capitalizing on Chance (ii)
  • (3/4) Power, power everywhere–(it) may not be what you think! [illustration]
  • (3/8) Msc kvetch: You are fully dressed (even under you clothes)?
  • (3/8) Fallacy of Rejection and the Fallacy of Nouvelle Cuisine
  • (3/11) Phil6334 Day #7: Selection effects, the Higgs and 5 sigma, Power
  • (3/12) Get empowered to detect power howlers
  • (3/15) New SEV calculator (guest app: Durvasula)
  • (3/17) Stephen Senn: “Delta Force: To what extent is clinical relevance relevant?” (Guest Post)

     

     

  • (3/19) Power taboos: Statue of Liberty, Senn, Neyman, Carnap, Severity
  • (3/22) Fallacies of statistics & statistics journalism, and how to avoid them: Summary & Slides Day #8 (Phil 6334)
  • (3/25) The Unexpected Way Philosophy Majors Are Changing The World Of Business

     

  • (3/26) Phil6334:Misspecification Testing: Ordering From A Full Diagnostic Menu (part 1)
  • (3/28) Severe osteometric probing of skeletal remains: John Byrd
  • (3/29) Winner of the March 2014 palindrome contest (rejected post)
  • (3/30) Phil6334: March 26, philosophy of misspecification testing (Day #9 slides)

[1] Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

[2] New Rule, July 30,2016, March 30,2017 (moved to 4) -very convenient way to allow data-dependent choices.

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Categories: 3-year memory lane, Error Statistics, Statistics | Leave a comment

Announcement: Columbia Workshop on Probability and Learning (April 8)

I’m speaking on “Probing with Severity” at the “Columbia Workshop on Probability and Learning” On April 8:

Meetings of the Formal Philosophy Group at Columbia

April 8, 2017

Department of Philosophy, Columbia University

Room 716
Philosophy Hall, 1150 Amsterdam Avenue
New York 10027
United States

Sponsor(s):

  • The Formal Philosophy Group (Columbia)

Main speakers:

Gordon Belot (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

Simon Huttegger (University of California, Irvine)

Deborah Mayo (Virginia Tech)

Teddy Seidenfeld (Carnegie Mellon University)

Organisers:

Michael Nielsen (Columbia University)

Rush Stewart (Columbia University)

Details

Unfortunately, access to Philosophy Hall is by swipe access on the weekends. However, students and faculty will be entering and exiting the building throughout the day (with relateively high frequency since there is a popular cafe on the main floor).

https://www.facebook.com/events/1869417706613583/

Categories: Announcement | Leave a comment

Er, about those other approaches, hold off until a balanced appraisal is in

I could have told them that the degree of accordance enabling the ASA’s “6 principles” on p-values was unlikely to be replicated when it came to most of the “other approaches” with which some would supplement or replace significance tests– notably Bayesian updating, Bayes factors, or likelihood ratios (confidence intervals are dual to hypotheses tests). [My commentary is here.] So now they may be advising a “hold off” or “go slow” approach until some consilience is achieved. Is that it? I don’t know. I was tweeted an article about the background chatter taking place behind the scenes; I wasn’t one of people interviewed for this. Here are some excerpts, I may add more later after it has had time to sink in. (check back later)

“Reaching for Best Practices in Statistics: Proceed with Caution Until a Balanced Critique Is In”

J. Hossiason

“[A]ll of the other approaches*, as well as most statistical tools, may suffer from many of the same problems as the p-values do. What level of likelihood ratio in favor of the research hypothesis will be acceptable to the journal? Should scientific discoveries be based on whether posterior odds pass a specific threshold (P3)? Does either measure the size of an effect (P5)?…How can we decide about the sample size needed for a clinical trial—however analyzed—if we do not set a specific bright-line decision rule? 95% confidence intervals or credence intervals…offer no protection against selection when only those that do not cover 0, are selected into the abstract (P4). (Benjamini, ASA commentary, pp. 3-4)

What’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander right?  Many statisticians seconded George Cobb who urged “the board to set aside time at least once every year to consider the potential value of similar statements” to the recent ASA p-value report. Disappointingly, a preliminary survey of leaders in statistics, many from the original p-value group, aired striking disagreements on best and worst practices with respect to these other approaches. The Executive Board is contemplating a variety of recommendations, minimally, that practitioners move with caution until they can put forward at least a few agreed upon principles for interpreting and applying Bayesian inference methods. The words we heard ranged from “go slow” to “moratorium [emphasis mine]. Having been privy to some of the results of this survey, we at Stat Report Watch decided to contact some of the individuals involved. Continue reading

Categories: P-values, reforming the reformers, Statistics | 6 Comments

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