Monthly Archives: June 2020

David Hand: Trustworthiness of Statistical Analysis (LSE PH 500 presentation)

This was David Hand’s guest presentation (25 June) at our zoomed graduate research seminar (LSE PH500) on Current Controversies in Phil Stat (~30 min.)  I’ll make some remarks in the comments, and invite yours.

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Trustworthiness of Statistical Analysis

David Hand

Abstract: Trust in statistical conclusions derives from the trustworthiness of the data and analysis methods. Trustworthiness of the analysis methods can be compromised by misunderstanding and incorrect application. However, that should stimulate a call for education and regulation, to ensure that methods are used correctly. The alternative of banning potentially useful methods, on the grounds that they are often misunderstood and misused is short-sighted, unscientific, and Procrustean. It damages the capability of science to advance, and feeds into public mistrust of the discipline.

Below are Prof.Hand’s slides w/o audio, followed by a video w/audio. You can also view them on the Meeting #6 post on the PhilStatWars blog (https://phil-stat-wars.com/2020/06/21/meeting-6-june-25/). Continue reading

Categories: LSE PH 500 | Tags: , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Bonus meeting: Graduate Research Seminar: Current Controversies in Phil Stat: LSE PH 500: 25 June 2020

Ship StatInfasSt

We’re holding a bonus, 6th, meeting of the graduate research seminar PH500 for the Philosophy, Logic & Scientific Method Department at the LSE:

(Remote 10am-12 EST, 15:00 – 17:00 London time; Thursday, June 25)

VI. (June 25) BONUS: Power, shpower, severity, positive predictive value (diagnostic model) & a Continuation of The Statistics Wars and Their Casualties

There will also be a guest speaker: Professor David Hand (Imperial College, London). Here is Professor Hand’s presentation (click on “present” to hear sound)

The main readings are on the blog page for the seminar.

 

Categories: Graduate Seminar PH500 LSE, power | Leave a comment

“On the Importance of testing a random sample (for Covid)”, an article from Significance magazine

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Nearly 3 months ago I tweeted “Stat people: shouldn’t they be testing a largish random sample of people [w/o symptoms] to assess rates, alert those infected, rather than only high risk, symptomatic people, in the U.S.?” I was surprised that nearly all the stat and medical people I know expressed the view that it wouldn’t be feasible or even very informative. Really? Granted, testing was and is limited, but had it been made a priority, it could have been done. In the new issue of Significance (June 2020) that I just received, James J. Cochran writes “on the importance of testing a random sample.” [1] 

Continue reading

Categories: random sample | 13 Comments

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