Monthly Archives: March 2018

February Palindrome Winner: Lucas Friesen

Winner of the February 2018 Palindrome Contest: (a dozen book choice)

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Lucas Friesen: a graduate student in Measurement, Evaluation, and Research Methodology at the University of British Columbia

Palindrome:

Ares, send a mere vest set? Bagel-bag madness.

Able! Elbas! Send AM: “Gable-Gab test severe. Madness era.”

The requirement: A palindrome using “madness*” (+ Elba, of course). Statistical, philosophical, scientific themes are awarded more points.) *Sorry, the editor got ahead of herself in an earlier post, listing March’s word.
Book choice: This is horribly difficult, but I think I have to go with the allure of the unknown: Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to get beyond the statistics wars.

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J. Pearl: Challenging the Hegemony of Randomized Controlled Trials: Comments on Deaton and Cartwright

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Judea Pearl

Judea Pearl* wrote to me to invite readers of Error Statistics Philosophy to comment on a recent post of his (from his Causal Analysis blog here) pertaining to a guest post by Stephen Senn (“Being a Statistician Means never Having to Say You Are Certain”.) He has added a special addendum for us.[i]

Challenging the Hegemony of Randomized Controlled Trials: Comments on Deaton and Cartwright

Judea Pearl

I was asked to comment on a recent article by Angus Deaton and Nancy Cartwright (D&C), which touches on the foundations of causal inference. The article is titled: “Understanding and misunderstanding randomized controlled trials,” and can be viewed here: https://goo.gl/x6s4Uy

My comments are a mixture of a welcome and a puzzle; I welcome D&C’s stand on the status of randomized trials, and I am puzzled by how they choose to articulate the alternatives. Continue reading

Categories: RCTs | 26 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (MARCH 2015): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: March 2015. I mark in red 3-4 posts from each month that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog, excluding those reblogged recently[1], and in green up to 3 others of general relevance to philosophy of statistics (in months where I’ve blogged a lot)[2].  Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group count as one.

March 2015

  • 03/01 “Probabilism as an Obstacle to Statistical Fraud-Busting”
  • 03/05 A puzzle about the latest test ban (or ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’)
  • 03/12 All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 3.5 years on
  • 03/16 Stephen Senn: The pathetic P-value (Guest Post)
  • 03/21 Objectivity in Statistics: “Arguments From Discretion and 3 Reactions”
  • 03/24 3 YEARS AGO (MARCH 2012): MEMORY LANE
  • 03/28 Your (very own) personalized genomic prediction varies depending on who else was around?

[1] Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

[2] New Rule, July 30,2016, March 30,2017 -a very convenient way to allow data-dependent choices (note why it’s legit in selecting blog posts, on severity grounds).

 

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Cover/Itinerary of Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars

SNEAK PREVIEW: Here’s the cover of Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars:

It should be out in July 2018. The “Itinerary”, generally known as the Table of Contents, is below. I forgot to mention that this is not the actual pagination, I don’t have the page proofs yet. These are the pages of the draft I submitted. It should be around 50 pages shorter in the actual page proofs, maybe 380 pages.

 

Itinerary

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Categories: Announcement | 9 Comments

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