Monthly Archives: January 2018

S. Senn: Evidence Based or Person-centred? A Statistical debate (Guest Post)

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Stephen Senn
Head of  Competence Center
for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health
Twitter @stephensenn

Evidence Based or Person-centred? A statistical debate

It was hearing Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum (RLA) in January 2017 speaking at the Epistemology of Causal Inference in Pharmacology conference in Munich organised by Jürgen Landes, Barbara Osmani and Roland Poellinger, that inspired me to buy their book, Causation A Very Short Introduction[1]. Although I do not agree with all that is said in it and also could not pretend to understand all it says, I can recommend it highly as an interesting introduction to issues in causality, some of which will be familiar to statisticians but some not at all.

Since I have a long-standing interest in researching into ways of delivering personalised medicine, I was interested to see a reference on Twitter to a piece by RLA, Evidence based or person centered? An ontological debate, in which she claims that the choice between evidence based or person-centred medicine is ultimately ontological[2]. I don’t dispute that thinking about health care delivery in ontological terms might be interesting. However, I do dispute that there is any meaningful choice between evidence based medicine (EBM) and person centred healthcare (PCH). To suggest so is to commit a category mistake by suggesting that means are alternatives to ends.

In fact, EBM will be essential to delivering effective PCH, as I shall now explain. Continue reading

Categories: personalized medicine, RCTs, S. Senn | 7 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (JANUARY 2015): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: January 2015. I mark in red 3-4 posts from each month that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog, excluding those reblogged recently[1], and in green 2-3 others of general relevance to philosophy of statistics (in months where I’ve blogged a lot)[2].  Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group count as one.

 

January 2015

  • 01/02 Blog Contents: Oct.- Dec. 2014
  • 01/03 No headache power (for Deirdre)
  • 01/04 Significance Levels are Made a Whipping Boy on Climate Change Evidence: Is .05 Too Strict? (Schachtman on Oreskes)
  • 01/07 “When Bayesian Inference Shatters” Owhadi, Scovel, and Sullivan (reblog)
  • 01/08 On the Brittleness of Bayesian Inference–An Update: Owhadi and Scovel (guest post).
  • 01/12 “Only those samples which fit the model best in cross validation were included” (whistleblower) “I suspect that we likely disagree with what constitutes validation” (Potti and Nevins)
  • 01/16 Winners of the December 2014 Palindrome Contest: TWO!
  • 01/18 Power Analysis and Non-Replicability: If bad statistics is prevalent in your field, does it follow you can’t be guilty of scientific fraud?
  • 01/21 Some statistical dirty laundry.
  • 01/24 What do these share in common: m&ms, limbo stick, ovulation, Dale Carnegie? Sat night potpourri
  • 01/26 Trial on Anil Potti’s (clinical) Trial Scandal Postponed Because Lawyers Get the Sniffles (updated)
  • 01/27 3 YEARS AGO: (JANUARY 2012) MEMORY LANE
  • 01/31 Saturday Night Brainstorming and Task Forces: (4th draft)

[1] Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

[2] New Rule, July 30,2016, March 30,2017 -a very convenient way to allow data-dependent choices (note why it’s legit in selecting blog posts, on severity grounds).

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S. Senn: Being a statistician means never having to say you are certain (Guest Post)

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Stephen Senn
Head of  Competence Center
for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health
Twitter @stephensenn

Being a statistician means never having to say you are certain

A recent discussion of randomised controlled trials[1] by Angus Deaton and Nancy Cartwright (D&C) contains much interesting analysis but also, in my opinion, does not escape rehashing some of the invalid criticisms of randomisation with which the literatures seems to be littered. The paper has two major sections. The latter, which deals with generalisation of results, or what is sometime called external validity, I like much more than the former which deals with internal validity. It is the former I propose to discuss.

Continue reading

Categories: Error Statistics, RCTs, Statistics | 26 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (DECEMBER 2014): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: December 2014. I mark in red 3-4 posts from each month that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog, excluding those reblogged recently[1], and in green 3- 4 others of general relevance to philosophy of statistics (in months where I’ve blogged a lot)[2].  Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group count as one.

December 2014

  • 12/02 My Rutgers Seminar: tomorrow, December 3, on philosophy of statistics
  • 12/04 “Probing with Severity: Beyond Bayesian Probabilism and Frequentist Performance” (Dec 3 Seminar slides)
  • 12/06 How power morcellators inadvertently spread uterine cancer
  • 12/11 Msc. Kvetch: What does it mean for a battle to be “lost by the media”?
  • 12/13 S. Stanley Young: Are there mortality co-benefits to the Clean Power Plan? It depends. (Guest Post)
  • 12/17 Announcing Kent Staley’s new book, An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (CUP)

  • 12/21 Derailment: Faking Science: A true story of academic fraud, by Diederik Stapel (translated into English)
  • 12/23 All I want for Chrismukkah is that critics & “reformers” quit howlers of testing (after 3 yrs of blogging)! So here’s Aris Spanos “Talking Back!”
  • 12/26 3 YEARS AGO: MONTHLY (Dec.) MEMORY LANE
  • 12/29 To raise the power of a test is to lower (not raise) the “hurdle” for rejecting the null (Ziliac and McCloskey 3 years on)
  • 12/31 Midnight With Birnbaum (Happy New Year)

 

[1] Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

[2] New Rule, July 30,2016, March 30,2017 -a very convenient way to allow data-dependent choices (note why it’s legit in selecting blog posts, on severity grounds).

 

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