Monthly Archives: March 2021

The Stat Wars and Intellectual conflicts of interest: Journal Editors

 

Like most wars, the Statistics Wars continues to have casualties. Some of the reforms thought to improve reliability and replication may actually create obstacles to methods known to improve on reliability and replication. At each one of our meeting of the Phil Stat Forum: “The Statistics Wars and Their Casualties,” I take 5 -10 minutes to draw out a proper subset of casualties associated with the topic of the presenter for the day. (The associated workshop that I have been organizing with Roman Frigg at the London School of Economics (CPNSS) now has a date for a hoped for in-person meeting in London: 24-25 September 2021.) Of course we’re interested not just in casualties but in positive contributions, though what counts as a casualty and what a contribution is itself a focus of philosophy of statistics battles.

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Categories: Error Statistics | Leave a comment

Reminder: March 25 “How Should Applied Science Journal Editors Deal With Statistical Controversies?” (Mark Burgman)

The seventh meeting of our Phil Stat Forum*:

The Statistics Wars
and Their Casualties

25 March, 2021

TIME: 15:00-16:45 (London); 11:00-12:45 (New York, NOTE TIME CHANGE TO MATCH UK TIME**)

For information about the Phil Stat Wars forum and how to join, click on this link.

How should applied science journal editors deal with statistical controversies?

Mark Burgman Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, confidence intervals and tests, P-values, significance tests | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Pandemic Nostalgia: The Corona Princess: Learning from a petri dish cruise (reblog 1yr)

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Last week, giving a long postponed talk for the NY/NY Metro Area Philosophers of Science Group (MAPS), I mentioned how my book Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars (2018, CUP) invites the reader to see themselves on a special interest cruise as we revisit old and new controversies in the philosophy of statistics–noting that I had no idea in writing the book that cruise ships would themselves become controversial in just a few years. The first thing I wrote during early pandemic days last March was this post on the Diamond Princess. The statistics gleaned from the ship remain important resources which haven’t been far off in many ways. I reblog it here. Continue reading

Categories: covid-19, memory lane | Leave a comment

March 25 “How Should Applied Science Journal Editors Deal With Statistical Controversies?” (Mark Burgman)

The seventh meeting of our Phil Stat Forum*:

The Statistics Wars
and Their Casualties

25 March, 2021

TIME: 15:00-16:45 (London); 11:00-12:45 (New York, NOTE TIME CHANGE)

For information about the Phil Stat Wars forum and how to join, click on this link.

How should applied science journal editors deal with statistical controversies?

Mark Burgman Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, confidence intervals and tests, P-values, significance tests | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Falsifying claims of trust in bat coronavirus research: mysteries of the mine (i)-(iv)

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Have you ever wondered if people read Master’s (or even Ph.D) theses a decade out? Whether or not you have, I think you will be intrigued to learn the story of why an obscure Master’s thesis from 2012, translated from Chinese in 2020, is now an integral key for unravelling the puzzle of the global controversy about the mechanism and origins of Covid-19. The Master’s thesis by a doctor, Li Xu [1], “The Analysis of 6 Patients with Severe Pneumonia Caused by Unknown Viruses”, describes 6 patients he helped to treat after they entered a hospital in 2012, one after the other, suffering from an atypical pneumonia from cleaning up after bats in an abandoned copper mine in China. Given the keen interest in finding the origin of the 2002–2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, Li wrote: “This makes the research of the bats in the mine where the six miners worked and later suffered from severe pneumonia caused by unknown virus a significant research topic”. He and the other doctors treating the mine cleaners hypothesized that their diseases were caused by a SARS-like coronavirus from having been in close proximity to the bats in the mine. Continue reading

Categories: covid-19, falsification, science communication | 22 Comments

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