Monthly Archives: July 2017

“A megateam of reproducibility-minded scientists” look to lowering the p-value

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Having discussed the “p-values overstate the evidence against the null fallacy” many times over the past few years, I leave it to readers to disinter the issues (pro and con), and appraise the assumptions, in the most recent rehearsal of the well-known Bayesian argument. There’s nothing intrinsically wrong with demanding everyone work with a lowered p-value–if you’re so inclined to embrace a single, dichotomous standard without context-dependent interpretations, especially if larger sample sizes are required to compensate the loss of power. But lowering the p-value won’t solve the problems that vex people (biasing selection effects), and is very likely to introduce new ones (see my comment). Kelly Servick, a reporter from Science, gives the ingredients of the main argument given by “a megateam of reproducibility-minded scientists” in an article out today: Continue reading

Categories: Error Statistics, highly probable vs highly probed, P-values, reforming the reformers | 55 Comments

3 YEARS AGO (JULY 2014): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago...

3 years ago…

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: July 2014. I mark in red 3-4 posts from each month that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog, excluding those reblogged recently[1]. Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group count as one. This month there are three such groups: 7/8 and 7/10; 7/14 and 7/23; 7/26 and 7/31.

July 2014

  • (7/7) Winner of June Palindrome Contest: Lori Wike
  • (7/8) Higgs Discovery 2 years on (1: “Is particle physics bad science?”)
  • (7/10) Higgs Discovery 2 years on (2: Higgs analysis and statistical flukes)
  • (7/14) “P-values overstate the evidence against the null”: legit or fallacious? (revised)
  • (7/23) Continued:”P-values overstate the evidence against the null”: legit or fallacious?
  • (7/26) S. Senn: “Responder despondency: myths of personalized medicine” (Guest Post)
  • (7/31) Roger Berger on Stephen Senn’s “Blood Simple” with a response by Senn (Guest Posts)

[1] Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014.

 

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Categories: 3-year memory lane, Higgs, P-values | Leave a comment

On the current state of play in the crisis of replication in psychology: some heresies

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The replication crisis has created a “cold war between those who built up modern psychology and those” tearing it down with failed replications–or so I read today [i]. As an outsider (to psychology), the severe tester is free to throw some fuel on the fire on both sides. This is a short update on my post “Some ironies in the replication crisis in social psychology” from 2014.

Following the model from clinical trials, an idea gaining steam is to prespecify a “detailed protocol that includes the study rationale, procedure and a detailed analysis plan” (Nosek et.al. 2017). In this new paper, they’re called registered reports (RRs). An excellent start. I say it makes no sense to favor preregistration and deny the relevance to evidence of optional stopping and outcomes other than the one observed. That your appraisal of the evidence is altered when you actually see the history supplied by the RR is equivalent to worrying about biasing selection effects when they’re not written down; your statistical method should pick up on them (as do p-values, confidence levels and many other error probabilities). There’s a tension between the RR requirements and accounts following the Likelihood Principle (no need to name names [ii]). Continue reading

Categories: Error Statistics, preregistration, reforming the reformers, replication research | 9 Comments

S. Senn: Fishing for fakes with Fisher (Guest Post)

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Stephen Senn
Head of  Competence Center
for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health
Twitter @stephensenn

Fishing for fakes with Fisher

 Stephen Senn

The essential fact governing our analysis is that the errors due to soil heterogeneity will be divided by a good experiment into two portions. The first, which is to be made as large as possible, will be completely eliminated, by the arrangement of the experiment, from the experimental comparisons, and will be as carefully eliminated in the statistical laboratory from the estimate of error. As to the remainder, which cannot be treated in this way, no attempt will be made to eliminate it in the field, but, on the contrary, it will be carefully randomised so as to provide a valid estimate of the errors to which the experiment is in fact liable. R. A. Fisher, The Design of Experiments, (Fisher 1990) section 28.

Fraudian analysis?

John Carlisle must be a man endowed with exceptional energy and determination. A recent paper of his is entitled, ‘Data fabrication and other reasons for non-random sampling in 5087 randomised, controlled trials in anaesthetic and general medical journals,’ (Carlisle 2017) and has created quite a stir. The journals examined include the Journal of the American Medical Association and the New England Journal of Medicine. What Carlisle did was examine 29,789 variables using 72,261 means to see if they were ‘consistent with random sampling’ (by which, I suppose, he means ‘randomisation’). The papers chosen had to report either standard deviations or standard errors of the mean. P-values as measures of balance or lack of it were then calculated using each of three methods and the method that gave the value closest to 0.5 was chosen. For a given trial the P-values chosen were then back-converted to z-scores combined by summing them and then re-converted back to P-values using a method that assumes the summed Z-scores to be independent. As Carlisle writes, ‘All p values were one-sided and inverted, such that dissimilar means generated p values near 1’. Continue reading

Categories: Fisher, RCTs, Stephen Senn | 5 Comments

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