Monthly Archives: September 2019

National Academies of Science: Please Correct Your Definitions of P-values

Mayo banging head

If you were on a committee to highlight issues surrounding P-values and replication, what’s the first definition you would check? Yes, exactly. Apparently, when it came to the recently released National Academies of Science “Consensus Study” Reproducibility and Replicability in Science 2019, no one did. Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, Error Statistics, P-values | 19 Comments

Hardwicke and Ioannidis, Gelman, and Mayo: P-values: Petitions, Practice, and Perils (and a question for readers)

.

The October 2019 issue of the European Journal of Clinical Investigations came out today. It includes the PERSPECTIVE article by Tom Hardwicke and John Ioannidis, an invited editorial by Gelman and one by me:

Petitions in scientific argumentation: Dissecting the request to retire statistical significance, by Tom Hardwicke and John Ioannidis

When we make recommendations for scientific practice, we are (at best) acting as social scientists, by Andrew Gelman

P-value thresholds: Forfeit at your peril, by Deborah Mayo

I blogged excerpts from my preprint, and some related posts, here.

All agree to the disagreement on the statistical and metastatistical issues: Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, P-values, stat wars and their casualties | 16 Comments

(Excerpts from) ‘P-Value Thresholds: Forfeit at Your Peril’ (free access)

.

A key recognition among those who write on the statistical crisis in science is that the pressure to publish attention-getting articles can incentivize researchers to produce eye-catching but inadequately scrutinized claims. We may see much the same sensationalism in broadcasting metastatistical research, especially if it takes the form of scapegoating or banning statistical significance. A lot of excitement was generated recently when Ron Wasserstein, Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA), and co-editors A. Schirm and N. Lazar, updated the 2016 ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance (ASA I). In their 2019 interpretation, ASA I “stopped just short of recommending that declarations of ‘statistical significance’ be abandoned,” and in their new statement (ASA II) announced: “We take that step here….’statistically significant’ –don’t say it and don’t use it”. To herald the ASA II, and the special issue “Moving to a world beyond ‘p < 0.05’”, the journal Nature requisitioned a commentary from Amrhein, Greenland and McShane “Retire Statistical Significance” (AGM). With over 800 signatories, the commentary received the imposing title “Scientists rise up against significance tests”! Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, P-values, stat wars and their casualties | 6 Comments

Gelman blogged our exchange on abandoning statistical significance

A. Gelman

I came across this post on Gelman’s blog today:

Exchange with Deborah Mayo on abandoning statistical significance

It was straight out of blog comments and email correspondence back when the ASA, and significant others, were rising up against the concept of statistical significance. Here it is: Continue reading

Categories: Gelman blogs an exchange with Mayo | Tags: | 7 Comments

All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 8 years on

.

Error Statistics Philosophy: Blog Contents (8 years)
By: D. G. Mayo

Dear Reader: I began this blog 8 years ago (Sept. 3, 2011)! A double celebration is taking place at the Elbar Room Friday evening (a smaller one was held earlier in the week), both for the blog and the 1 year anniversary of the physical appearance of my book: Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars [SIST] (CUP). A special rush edition made an appearance on Sept 3, 2018 in time for the RSS meeting in Cardiff. If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by for some Elba Grease.

Ship Statinfasst made its most recent journey at the Summer Seminar for Phil Stat from July 28-Aug 11, co-directed with Aris Spanos. It was one of the main events that occupied my time the past academic year, from the planning, advertising and running. We had 15 fantastic faculty and post-doc participants (from 55 applicants), and plan to continue the movement to incorporate PhilStat in philosophy and methodology, both in teaching and research. You can find slides from the Seminar (zoom videos, including those of special invited speakers, to come) on SummerSeminarPhilStat.com. Slides and other materials from the Spring Seminar co-taught with Aris Spanos (and cross-listed with Economics) can be found on this blog here

Continue reading

Categories: 8 year memory lane, blog contents, Metablog | 3 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.