Monthly Archives: April 2020

‘What can psychology’s statistics reformers learn from the error-statistical perspective?’

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This is the title of Brian Haig’s recent paper in Methods in Psychology 2 (Nov. 2020). Haig is a professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Canterbury. Here he provides both a thorough and insightful review of my book Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars (CUP, 2018) as well as an excellent overview of the high points of today’s statistics wars and the replication crisis, especially from the perspective of psychology. I’ll excerpt from his article in a couple of posts. The full article, which is open access, is here

Abstract: In this article, I critically evaluate two major contemporary proposals for reforming statistical thinking in psychology: The recommendation that psychology should employ the “new statistics” in its research practice, and the alternative proposal that it should embrace Bayesian statistics. I do this from the vantage point of the modern error-statistical perspective, which emphasizes the importance of the severe testing of knowledge claims. I also show how this error-statistical perspective improves our understanding of the nature of science by adopting a workable process of falsification and by structuring inquiry in terms of a hierarchy of models. Before concluding, I briefly discuss the importance of the philosophy of statistics for improving our understanding of statistical thinking.

Brian Haig

Keywords: The error-statistical perspective, The new statistics, Bayesian statistics, Falsificationism, Hierarchy of models, Philosophy of statistics Continue reading

Categories: Brian Haig, Statistical Inference as Severe Testing–Review | 12 Comments

S. Senn: Randomisation is not about balance, nor about homogeneity but about randomness (Guest Post)

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Stephen Senn
Consultant Statistician
Edinburgh

The intellectual illness of clinical drug evaluation that I have discussed here can be cured, and it will be cured when we restore intellectual primacy to the questions we ask, not the methods by which we answer them. Lewis Sheiner1

Cause for concern

In their recent essay Causal Evidence and Dispositions in Medicine and Public Health2, Elena Rocca and Rani Lill Anjum challenge, ‘the epistemic primacy of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for establishing causality in medicine and public health’. That an otherwise stimulating essay by two philosophers, experts on causality, which makes many excellent points on the nature of evidence, repeats a common misunderstanding about randomised clinical trials, is grounds enough for me to address this topic again.  Before, however, explaining why I disagree with Rocca and Anjum on RCTs, I want to make clear that I agree with much of what they say. I loathe these pyramids of evidence, beloved by some members of the evidence-based movement, which have RCTs at the apex or possibly occupying a second place just underneath meta-analyses of RCTs. In fact, although I am a great fan of RCTs and (usually) of intention to treat analysis, I am convinced that RCTs alone are not enough. My thinking on this was profoundly affected by Lewis Sheiner’s essay of nearly thirty years ago (from which the quote at the beginning of this blog is taken). Lewis was interested in many aspects of investigating the effects of drugs and would, I am sure, have approved of Rocca and Anjum’s insistence that there are many layers of understanding how and why things work, and that means of investigating them may have to range from basic laboratory experiments to patient narratives via RCTs. Rocca and Anjum’s essay provides a good discussion of the various ‘causal tasks’ that need to be addressed and backs this up with some excellent examples. Continue reading

Categories: RCTs, S. Senn | 28 Comments

Paradigm Shift in Pandemic (Vent) Protocols?

Lung Scans[0]

As much as doctors and hospitals are raising alarms about a shortage of ventilators for Covid-19 patients, some doctors have begun to call for entirely reassessing the standard paradigm for their use–according to a cluster of articles to appear in the last week. “What’s driving this reassessment is a baffling observation about Covid-19: Many patients have blood oxygen levels so low they should be dead. But they’re not gasping for air, their hearts aren’t racing, and their brains show no signs of blinking off from lack of oxygen.”[1] Within that group of patients, some doctors wonder if the standard use of mechanical ventilators does more harm than good.[2] The issue is controversial; I’ll just report what I find in the articles over the past week. Please share ongoing updates in the comments. Continue reading

Categories: covid-19 | 60 Comments

A. Spanos:  Isaac Newton and his two years in quarantine:  how science could germinate in bewildering ways (Guest post)

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Aris Spanos
Wilson Schmidt Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Virginia Tech

Beyond the plenitude of misery and suffering that pandemics bring down on humanity, occasionally they contribute to the betterment of humankind by (inadvertently) boosting creative activity that leads to knowledge, and not just in epidemiology. A case in point is that of Isaac Newton and the pandemic of 1665-6.  Continue reading

Categories: quarantine, Spanos | 14 Comments

April 1, 2020: Memory Lane of April 1’s past

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My “April 1” posts for the past 8 years have been so close to the truth or possible truth that they weren’t always spotted as April Fool’s pranks, which is what made them genuine April Fool’s pranks. (After a few days I either labeled them as such, e.g., “check date!”, or revealed it in a comment). Given the level of current chaos and stress, I decided against putting up a planned post for today, so I’m just doing a memory lane of past posts. (You can tell from reading the comments which had most people fooled.) Continue reading

Categories: Comedy, Statistics | Leave a comment

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