Posts Tagged With: risk assessment policy

Objectivity #3: Clean(er) Hands With Metastatistics

I claim that all but the first of the “dirty hands” argument’s five premises are flawed. Even the first premise too directly identifies a policy decision with a statistical report. But the key flaws begin with premise 2. Although risk policies may be based on a statistical report of evidence, it does not follow that the considerations suitable for judging risk policies are the ones suitable for judging the statistical report. They are not. The latter, of course, should not be reduced to some kind of unthinking accept/reject report. If responsible, it must clearly and completely report the nature and extent of (risk-related) effects that are and are not indicated by the data, making plain how the methodological choices made in the generation, modeling, and interpreting of data raise or lower the chances of finding evidence of specific risks. These choices may be called risk assessment policy (RAP) choices. Continue reading

Categories: Objectivity, Objectivity, Statistics | Tags: , | 10 Comments

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