Announcement: U-Phil Extension: Blogging the Likelihood Principle

U-Phil: I am extending to Dec. 19, 2012 the date for sending me responses to the “U-Phil” call, see initial call, given some requests for more time. The details of the specific U-Phil may be found here, but you might also look at the post relating to my 28 Nov. seminar at the LSE, which is directly on the topic: the infamous (strong) likelihood principle (SLP). “U-Phil, ” which is short for “you ‘philosophize'” is really just an opportunity to write something .5-1 notch above an ordinary comment (focussed on one or more specific posts/papers, as described in each call): it can be longer (~500-1000 words), and it appears in the regular blog area rather than as a comment.  Your remarks can relate to the guest graduate student post by Gregory Gandenberger, and/or my discussion/argument. Graduate student posts (e.g., attendees of my 28 Nov. LSE seminar?) are especially welcome*. Earlier explemplars of U-Phils may be found here; and more by searching this blog.

Thanks to everyone who sent me names of vintage typewriter repair shops in London, after the airline damage: the “x” is fixed, but the “z” key is still misbehaving.

*Another post of possible relevance to graduate students comes up when searching this blog for  “sex”.

Categories: Announcement, Likelihood Principle, U-Phil | Leave a comment

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