Our session is now remote: Philo of Sci Association (PSA): Philosophy IN Science (PinS): Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science?

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Philosophy in Science: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science?
     on November 13, 2-4 pm

 

OUR SESSION HAS BECOME REMOTE: PLEASE JOIN US on ZOOM! This session revolves around the intriguing question: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science? They’re calling it philosophy “in” science–when philosophical ministrations actually intervene in a science itself.  This is the session I’ll be speaking in. I hope you will come to our session if you’re there–it’s hybrid, so you can’t see it through a remote link. But I’d like to hear what you think about this question–in the comments to this post.

Aris Spanos will be the presenter of a joint contribution at the hybrid  session (Current debates on Statistical Modeling and Inference) that I posted on earlier (Saturday Nov 13, 9-12:15). This is the PSA’s  biennial meeting (one year late)–live/hybrid/remote*.

Here are the members and talks (Link to session/abstracts):

  • Thomas Pradeu (CNRS & University Of Bordeaux) & Maël Lemoine (University Of Bordeaux): Philosophy in Science: Definition and Boundaries
  • Deborah Mayo (Virginia Tech): My Philosophical Interventions in Statistics
  • Elliott Sober (University Of Wisconsin – Madison): Philosophical Interventions in Science – a Strategy and a Case Study (Parsimony)
  • Randolph Nesse (Arizona State University) & Paul Griffiths (University of Sydney): How Evolutionary Science and Philosophy Can Collaborate to Redefine Disease

Session Abstract: Although the question of what philosophy can bring to science is an old topic, the vast majority of current philosophy of science is a meta-discourse on science, taking science as its object of study, rather than an attempt to intervene on science itself. In this symposium, we discuss a particular interventionist approach, which we call “philosophy in science (PinS)”, i.e., an attempt at using philosophical tools to make a significant scientific contribution. This approach remains rare, but has been very successful in a number of cases, especially in philosophy of biology, medicine, physics, statistics, and the social sciences. Our goal is to provide a description of PinS through both a bibliometric approach and the examination of specific case studies. We also aim to explain how PinS differs from mainstream philosophy of science and partly similar approaches such as “philosophy of science in practice”.

You have to register to participate, but anyone who is registered (reduced rate for remote only participants) can attend the remote sessions.

*There’s a complex mix of viewing classifications, wherein only in-person people can view in person or hybrid sessions, but all registrants can see all remote sessions.

Philosophy in Science: Can Philosophers of Science Contribute to Science?

Categories: Announcement, PSA 2021 | Leave a comment

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