PhilPharma

S. Senn: “Placebos: it’s not only the patients that are fooled” (Guest Post)

Stephen Senn

Stephen Senn

Placebos: it’s not only the patients that are fooled

Stephen Senn
Head of  Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS)
Luxembourg Institute of Health

In my opinion a great deal of ink is wasted to little purpose in discussing placebos in clinical trials. Many commentators simply do not understand the nature and purpose of placebos. To start with the latter, their only purpose is to permit blinding of treatments and, to continue to the former, this implies that their nature is that they are specific to the treatment studied.

Consider an example. Suppose that Pannostrum Pharmaceuticals wishes to prove that its new treatment for migraine, Paineaze® (which is in the form of a small red circular pill) is superior to the market-leader offered by Allexir Laboratories, Kalmer® (which is a large purple lozenge). Pannostrum decides to do a head-to head comparison and of course, therefore will require placebos. Every patient will have to take a red pill and a purple lozenge. In the Paineaze arm what is red will be Paineaze and what is purple ‘placebo to Kalmer’. In the Kalmer arm what is red will be ‘placebo to Paineaze’ and what is purple will be Kalmer.

senn-placebo

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Categories: PhilPharma, PhilStat/Med, Statistics, Stephen Senn | 6 Comments

Stephen Senn: Is Pooling Fooling? (Guest Post)

Stephen Senn

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Stephen Senn
Head, Methodology and Statistics Group,
Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS), Luxembourg

Is Pooling Fooling?

‘And take the case of a man who is ill. I call two physicians: they differ in opinion. I am not to lie down, and die between them: I must do something.’ Samuel Johnson, in Boswell’s A Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

A common dilemma facing meta-analysts is what to put together with what? One may have a set of trials that seem to be approximately addressing the same question but some features may differ. For example, the inclusion criteria might have differed with some trials only admitting patients who were extremely ill but with other trials treating the moderately ill as well. Or it might be the case that different measurements have been taken in different trials. An even more extreme case occurs when different, if presumed similar, treatments have been used.

It is helpful to make a point of terminology here. In what follows I shall be talking about pooling results from various trials. This does not involve naïve pooling of patients across trials. I assume that each trial will provide a valid within- trial comparison of treatments. It is these comparisons that are to be pooled (appropriately).

A possible way to think of this is in terms of a Bayesian model with a prior distribution covering the extent to which results might differ as features of trials are changed. I don’t deny that this is sometimes an interesting way of looking at things (although I do maintain that it is much more tricky than many might suppose[1]) but I would also like to draw attention to the fact that there is a frequentist way of looking at this problem that is also useful.

Suppose that we have k ‘null’ hypotheses that we are interested in testing, each being capable of being tested in one of k trials. We can label these Hn1, Hn2, … Hnk. We are perfectly entitled to test the null hypothesis Hjoint that they are all jointly true. In doing this we can use appropriate judgement to construct a composite statistic based on all the trials whose distribution is known under the null. This is a justification for pooling. Continue reading

Categories: evidence-based policy, PhilPharma, S. Senn, Statistics | 19 Comments

Roger Berger on Stephen Senn’s “Blood Simple” with a response by Senn (Guest posts)

Roger BergerRoger L. Berger

School Director & Professor
School of Mathematical & Natural Science
Arizona State University

Comment on S. Senn’s post: Blood Simple? The complicated and controversial world of bioequivalence”(*)

First, I do agree with Senn’s statement that “the FDA requires conventional placebo-controlled trials of a new treatment to be tested at the 5% level two-sided but since they would never accept a treatment that was worse than placebo the regulator’s risk is 2.5% not 5%.” The FDA procedure essentially defines a one-sided test with Type I error probability (size) of .025. Why it is not just called this, I do not know. And if the regulators believe .025 is the appropriate Type I error probability, then perhaps it should be used in other situations, e.g., bioequivalence testing, as well.

Senn refers to a paper by Hsu and me (Berger and Hsu (1996)), and then attempts to characterize what we said. Unfortunately, I believe he has mischaracterized. Continue reading

Categories: bioequivalence, frequentist/Bayesian, PhilPharma, Statistics | Tags: , | 22 Comments

“The medical press must become irrelevant to publication of clinical trials.”

pmed0020138g001“The medical press must become irrelevant to publication of clinical trials.” So said Stephen Senn at a recent meeting of the Medical Journalists’ Association with the title: “Is the current system of publishing clinical trials fit for purpose?” Senn has thrown a few stones in the direction of medical journals in guest posts on this blog, and in this paper, but it’s the first I heard him go this far. He wasn’t the only one answering the conference question “No!” much to the surprise of medical journalist Jane Feinmann, whose article I am excerpting:

 So what happened? Medical journals, the main vehicles for publishing clinical trials today, are after all the ‘gatekeepers of medical evidence’—as they are described in Bad Pharma, Ben Goldacre’s 2012 bestseller. …

… The Alltrials campaign, launched two years ago on the back of Goldacre’s book, has attracted an extraordinary level of support. … Continue reading

Categories: PhilPharma, science communication, Statistics | 5 Comments

Stephen Senn: Blood Simple? The complicated and controversial world of bioequivalence (guest post)

Stephen SennBlood Simple?
The complicated and controversial world of bioequivalence

by Stephen Senn*

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Those not familiar with drug development might suppose that showing that a new pharmaceutical formulation (say a generic drug) is equivalent to a formulation that has a licence (say a brand name drug) ought to be simple. However, it can often turn out to be bafflingly difficult[1]. Continue reading

Categories: bioequivalence, confidence intervals and tests, PhilPharma, Statistics, Stephen Senn | 22 Comments

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