slides

Replication Crises and the Statistics Wars: Hidden Controversies

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Below are the slides from my June 14 presentation at the X-Phil conference on Reproducibility and Replicability in Psychology and Experimental Philosophy at University College London. What I think must be examined seriously are the “hidden” issues that are going unattended in replication research and related statistics wars. An overview of the “hidden controversies” are on slide #3. Although I was presenting them as “hidden”, I hoped they wouldn’t be quite as invisible as I found them through the conference. (Since my talk was at the start, I didn’t know what to expect–else I might have noted some examples that seemed to call for further scrutiny). Exceptions came largely (but not exclusively) from a small group of philosophers (me, Machery and Fletcher). Then again,there were parallel sessions, so I missed some.  However, I did learn something about X-phil, particularly from the very interesting poster session [1]. This new area should invite much, much more scrutiny of statistical methodology from philosophers of science.

[1] The women who organized and ran the conference did an excellent job: Lara Kirfel, a psychology PhD student at UCL, and Pascale Willemsen from Ruhr University.

Categories: Philosophy of Statistics, replication research, slides | Leave a comment

Your data-driven claims must still be probed severely

Vagelos Education Center

Below are the slides from my talk today at Columbia University at a session, Philosophy of Science and the New Paradigm of Data-Driven Science, at an American Statistical Association Conference on Statistical Learning and Data Science/Nonparametric Statistics. Todd was brave to sneak in philosophy of science in an otherwise highly mathematical conference.

Philosophy of Science and the New Paradigm of Data-Driven Science : (Room VEC 902/903)
Organizer and Chair: Todd Kuffner (Washington U)

  1. Deborah Mayo (Virginia Tech) “Your Data-Driven Claims Must Still be Probed Severely”
  2.  Ian McKeague (Columbia) “On the Replicability of Scientific Studies”
  3.  Xiao-Li Meng (Harvard) “Conducting Highly Principled Data Science: A Statistician’s Job and Joy

 

Categories: slides, Statistics and Data Science | 5 Comments

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