stat wars and their casualties

JSM 2020 Panel on P-values & “Statistical Significance”

All: On July 30 (10am EST) I will give a virtual version of my JSM presentation, remotely like the one I will actually give on Aug 6 at the JSM. Co-panelist Stan Young may as well. One of our surprise guests tomorrow (not at the JSM) will be Yoav Benjamini!  If you’re interested in attending our July 30 practice session* please follow the directions here. Background items for this session are in the “readings” and “memos” of session 5.

*unless you’re already on our LSE Phil500 list

JSM 2020 Panel Flyer (PDF)
JSM online program w/panel abstract & information):

Categories: Announcement, JSM 2020, significance tests, stat wars and their casualties | Leave a comment

On Some Self-Defeating Aspects of the ASA’s (2019) Recommendations on Statistical Significance Tests (ii)

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“Before we stood on the edge of the precipice, now we have taken a great step forward”

 

What’s self-defeating about pursuing statistical reforms in the manner taken by the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 2019? In case you’re not up on the latest in significance testing wars, the 2016 ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance, ASA I, arguably, was a reasonably consensual statement on the need to avoid some well-known abuses of P-values–notably if you compute P-values, ignoring selective reporting, multiple testing, or stopping when the data look good, the computed P-value will be invalid. (Principle 4, ASA I) But then Ron Wasserstein, executive director of the ASA, and co-editors, decided they weren’t happy with their own 2016 statement because it “stopped just short of recommending that declarations of ‘statistical significance’ be abandoned” altogether. In their new statement–ASA II(note)–they announced: “We take that step here….Statistically significant –don’t say it and don’t use it”.

Why do I say it is a mis-take to have taken the supposed next “great step forward”? Why do I count it as unsuccessful as a piece of statistical science policy? In what ways does it make the situation worse? Let me count the ways. The first is in this post. Others will come in following posts, until I become too disconsolate to continue.[i] Continue reading

Categories: P-values, stat wars and their casualties, statistical significance tests | 14 Comments

Hardwicke and Ioannidis, Gelman, and Mayo: P-values: Petitions, Practice, and Perils (and a question for readers)

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The October 2019 issue of the European Journal of Clinical Investigations came out today. It includes the PERSPECTIVE article by Tom Hardwicke and John Ioannidis, an invited editorial by Gelman and one by me:

Petitions in scientific argumentation: Dissecting the request to retire statistical significance, by Tom Hardwicke and John Ioannidis

When we make recommendations for scientific practice, we are (at best) acting as social scientists, by Andrew Gelman

P-value thresholds: Forfeit at your peril, by Deborah Mayo

I blogged excerpts from my preprint, and some related posts, here.

All agree to the disagreement on the statistical and metastatistical issues: Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, P-values, stat wars and their casualties | 16 Comments

(Excerpts from) ‘P-Value Thresholds: Forfeit at Your Peril’ (free access)

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A key recognition among those who write on the statistical crisis in science is that the pressure to publish attention-getting articles can incentivize researchers to produce eye-catching but inadequately scrutinized claims. We may see much the same sensationalism in broadcasting metastatistical research, especially if it takes the form of scapegoating or banning statistical significance. A lot of excitement was generated recently when Ron Wasserstein, Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA), and co-editors A. Schirm and N. Lazar, updated(note) the 2016 ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance (ASA I). In their 2019 interpretation, ASA I “stopped just short of recommending that declarations of ‘statistical significance’ be abandoned,” and in their new statement (ASA II) announced: “We take that step here….’statistically significant’ –don’t say it and don’t use it”. To herald the ASA II(note), and the special issue “Moving to a world beyond ‘p < 0.05’”, the journal Nature requisitioned a commentary from Amrhein, Greenland and McShane “Retire Statistical Significance” (AGM). With over 800 signatories, the commentary received the imposing title “Scientists rise up against significance tests”! Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, P-values, stat wars and their casualties | 6 Comments

The Statistics Wars: Errors and Casualties

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Had I been scheduled to speak later at the 12th MuST Conference & 3rd Workshop “Perspectives on Scientific Error” in Munich, rather than on day 1, I could have (constructively) illustrated some of the errors and casualties by reference to a few of the conference papers that discussed significance tests. (Most gave illuminating discussions of such topics as replication research, the biases that discredit meta-analysis, statistics in the law, formal epistemology [i]). My slides follow my abstract. Continue reading

Categories: slides, stat wars and their casualties | Tags: | Leave a comment

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