significance tests

Reminder: March 25 “How Should Applied Science Journal Editors Deal With Statistical Controversies?” (Mark Burgman)

The seventh meeting of our Phil Stat Forum*:

The Statistics Wars
and Their Casualties

25 March, 2021

TIME: 15:00-16:45 (London); 11:00-12:45 (New York, NOTE TIME CHANGE TO MATCH UK TIME**)

For information about the Phil Stat Wars forum and how to join, click on this link.

How should applied science journal editors deal with statistical controversies?

Mark Burgman

Mark Burgman is the Director of the Centre for Environmental Policy at Imperial College London and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Conservation Biology, Chair in Risk Analysis & Environmental Policy. Previously, he was Adrienne Clarke Chair of Botany at the University of Melbourne, Australia. He works on expert judgement, ecological modelling, conservation biology and risk assessment. He has written models for biosecurity, medicine regulation, marine fisheries, forestry, irrigation, electrical power utilities, mining, and national park planning. He received a BSc from the University of New South Wales (1974), an MSc from Macquarie University, Sydney (1981), and a PhD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1987). He worked as a consultant ecologist and research scientist in Australia, the United States and Switzerland during the 1980’s before joining the University of Melbourne in 1990. He joined CEP in February, 2017. He has published over two hundred and fifty refereed papers and book chapters and seven authored books. He was elected to the Australian Academy of Science in 2006.

Abstract: Applied sciences come with different focuses. In environmental science, as in epidemiology, the framing and context of problems is often in crises. Decisions are imminent, data and understanding are incomplete, and ramifications of decisions are substantial. This context makes the implications of inferences from data especially poignant. It also makes the claims made by fervent and dedicated authors especially challenging. The full gamut of potential statistical foibles and psychological frailties are on display. In this presentation, I will outline and summarise the kinds of errors of reasoning that are especially prevalent in ecology and conservation biology. I will outline how these things appear to be changing, providing some recent examples. Finally, I will describe some implications of alternative editorial policies.

Some questions:

*Would it be a good thing to dispense with p-values, either through encouragement or through strict editorial policy?

*Would it be a good thing to insist on confidence intervals?

*Should editors of journals in a broad discipline, band together and post common editorial policies for statistical inference?

*Should all papers be reviewed by a professional statistician?

If so, which kind?


Readings/Slides:

Professor Burgman is developing this topic anew, so we don’t have the usual background reading. However, we do have his slides:

*Mark Burgman’s Draft Slides:  “How should applied science journal editors deal with statistical controversies?” (pdf)

*D. Mayo’s Slides: “The Statistics Wars and Their Casualties for Journal Editors: Intellectual Conflicts of Interest: Questions for Burgman” (pdf)

*A paper of mine from the Joint Statistical Meetings, “Rejecting Statistical Significance Tests: Defanging the Arguments”, discusses an episode that is relevant for the general topic of how journal editors should deal with statistical controversies.


Video Links: 

Mark Burgman’s presentation:

D. Mayo’s Casualties:

Please feel free to continue the discussion by posting questions or thoughts in the comments section on this PhilStatWars post.


*Meeting 15 of our the general Phil Stat series which began with the LSE Seminar PH500 on May 21

**UK doesn’t change their clock until March 28.

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, confidence intervals and tests, P-values, significance tests | Tags: , | 1 Comment

March 25 “How Should Applied Science Journal Editors Deal With Statistical Controversies?” (Mark Burgman)

The seventh meeting of our Phil Stat Forum*:

The Statistics Wars
and Their Casualties

25 March, 2021

TIME: 15:00-16:45 (London); 11:00-12:45 (New York, NOTE TIME CHANGE)

For information about the Phil Stat Wars forum and how to join, click on this link.

How should applied science journal editors deal with statistical controversies?

Mark Burgman Continue reading

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, confidence intervals and tests, P-values, significance tests | Tags: , | 1 Comment

S. Senn: Testing Times (Guest post)

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Stephen Senn
Consultant Statistician
Edinburgh, Scotland

Testing Times

Screening for attention

There has been much comment on Twitter and other social media about testing for coronavirus and the relationship between a test being positive and the person tested having been infected. Some primitive form of Bayesian reasoning is often used  to justify concern that an apparent positive may actually be falsely so, with specificity and sensitivity taking the roles of likelihoods and prevalence that of a prior distribution. This way of looking at testing dates back at least to a paper of 1959 by Ledley and Lusted[1]. However, as others[2, 3] have pointed out, there is a trap for the unwary in this, in that it is implicitly assumed that specificity and sensitivity are constant values unaffected by prevalence and it is far from obvious that this should be the case. Continue reading

Categories: S. Senn, significance tests, Testing Assumptions | 14 Comments

August 6: JSM 2020 Panel on P-values & “Statistical Significance”

SLIDES FROM MY PRESENTATION

July 30 PRACTICE VIDEO for JSM talk (All materials for Practice JSM session here)

JSM 2020 Panel Flyer (PDF)
JSM online program w/panel abstract & information):

Categories: ASA Guide to P-values, Error Statistics, evidence-based policy, JSM 2020, P-values, Philosophy of Statistics, science communication, significance tests | 3 Comments

JSM 2020 Panel on P-values & “Statistical Significance”

All: On July 30 (10am EST) I will give a virtual version of my JSM presentation, remotely like the one I will actually give on Aug 6 at the JSM. Co-panelist Stan Young may as well. One of our surprise guests tomorrow (not at the JSM) will be Yoav Benjamini!  If you’re interested in attending our July 30 practice session* please follow the directions here. Background items for this session are in the “readings” and “memos” of session 5.

*unless you’re already on our LSE Phil500 list

JSM 2020 Panel Flyer (PDF)
JSM online program w/panel abstract & information): Continue reading

Categories: Announcement, JSM 2020, significance tests, stat wars and their casualties | Leave a comment

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