highly probable vs highly probed

“P-values overstate the evidence against the null”: legit or fallacious? (revised)

0. July 20, 2014: Some of the comments to this post reveal that using the word “fallacy” in my original title might have encouraged running together the current issue with the fallacy of transposing the conditional. Please see a newly added Section 7.

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Categories: Bayesian/frequentist, CIs and tests, fallacy of rejection, highly probable vs highly probed, P-values, Statistics

Higgs discovery two years on (2: Higgs analysis and statistical flukes)

Higgs_cake-sI’m reblogging a few of the Higgs posts, with some updated remarks, on this two-year anniversary of the discovery. (The first was in my last post.) The following, was originally “Higgs Analysis and Statistical Flukes: part 2″ (from March, 2013).[1]

Some people say to me: “This kind of reasoning is fine for a ‘sexy science’ like high energy physics (HEP)”–as if their statistical inferences are radically different. But I maintain that this is the mode by which data are used in “uncertain” reasoning across the entire landscape of science and day-to-day learning (at least, when we’re trying to find things out)[2] Even with high level theories, the particular problems of learning from data are tackled piecemeal, in local inferences that afford error control. Granted, this statistical philosophy differs importantly from those that view the task as assigning comparative (or absolute) degrees-of-support/belief/plausibility to propositions, models, or theories.  Continue reading

Categories: Higgs, highly probable vs highly probed, P-values, Severity, Statistics

Phil 6334: Duhem’s Problem, highly probable vs highly probed; Day #9 Slides

 

picture-216-1April 3, 2014: We interspersed discussion with slides; these cover the main readings of the day (check syllabus): the Duhem’s Problem and the Bayesian Way, and “Highly probable vs Highly Probed”. syllabus four. Slides are below (followers of this blog will be familiar with most of this, e.g., here). We also did further work on misspecification testing.

Monday, April 7, is an optional outing, “a seminar class trip”

"Thebes", Blacksburg, VA

“Thebes”, Blacksburg, VA

you might say, here at Thebes at which time we will analyze the statistical curves of the mountains, pie charts of pizza, and (seriously) study some experiments on the problem of replication in “the Hamlet Effect in social psychology”. If you’re around please bop in!

Mayo’s slides on Duhem’s Problem and more from April 3 (Day#9):

 

 

Categories: Bayesian/frequentist, highly probable vs highly probed, misspecification testing

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