randomization

Stephen Senn: Being Just about Adjustment (Guest Post)

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Stephen Senn
Consultant Statistician
Edinburgh

Correcting errors about corrected estimates

Randomised clinical trials are a powerful tool for investigating the effects of treatments. Given appropriate design, conduct and analysis they can deliver good estimates of effects. The key feature is concurrent control. Without concurrent control, randomisation is impossible. Randomisation is necessary, although not sufficient, for effective blinding. It also is an appropriate way to deal with unmeasured predictors, that is to say suspected but unobserved factors that might also affect outcome. It does this by ensuring that, in the absence of any treatment effect, the expected value of variation between and within groups is the same. Furthermore, probabilities regarding the relative variation can be delivered and this is what is necessary for valid inference. Continue reading

Categories: randomization, S. Senn | 6 Comments

S. Senn: “Error point: The importance of knowing how much you don’t know” (guest post)

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Stephen Senn
Consultant Statistician
Edinburgh

‘The term “point estimation” made Fisher nervous, because he associated it with estimation without regard to accuracy, which he regarded as ridiculous.’ Jimmy Savage [1, p. 453] 

First things second

The classic text by David Cox and David Hinkley, Theoretical Statistics (1974), has two extremely interesting features as regards estimation. The first is in the form of an indirect, implicit, message and the second explicit and both teach that point estimation is far from being an obvious goal of statistical inference. The indirect message is that the chapter on point estimation (chapter 8) comes after that on interval estimation (chapter 7). This may puzzle the reader, who may anticipate that the complications of interval estimation would be handled after the apparently simpler point estimation rather than before. However, with the start of chapter 8, the reasoning is made clear. Cox and Hinkley state: Continue reading

Categories: Fisher, randomization, Stephen Senn | Tags: | 8 Comments

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